Quantcast
RELATED
Why Black Women Still Haven’t Rebounded From Pandemic Job Losses
Workin' Girl

Why Black Women Still Haven’t Rebounded From Pandemic Job Losses

The COVID-19 pandemic hit the economy hard as many jobs were lost due to temporary and permanent business closures. The Census Bureau’s Pulse survey showed that tens of millions of people lost their jobs during the early months of the pandemic and while the economy has begun to recover, we still have a long way to go particularly our Black women.


The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) data showed that women received 40.3% of the 467,000 jobs that the economy gained in January 2022. However, 1 out of 17 Black women ages 20 years and over were still unemployed. That’s in comparison to 1 in 20 Latinas and 1 in 31 Asian women. So, why are Black women still behind in the workforce?

Getty Images

According to NWLC, a lot of it has a lot to do with the fields that many Black women were working in, which were hit the hardest. One out of three Black women were essential workers in roles that required them to be on the front line. These roles ranged from registered nurse to retail sales. And even in those roles, they were paid 63 cents on the dollar in comparison to white men who worked those same jobs.

The data gave this example: “Black women working full-time, year-round as registered nurses make 90 cents for every dollar white, non-Hispanic men in these jobs; their typical annual losses to the wage gap total $7,000. Meanwhile, Black women working full-time, year-round as supervisors of retail sales workers make just 65 cents for every dollar white, non-Hispanic men make in these jobs, which adds up to a typical annual loss of $18,000.”

Getty Images

The report also pointed out that Black women who returned to the labor force after losing employment during the pandemic were only left with low paying jobs to choose from, which is only further increasing the wage gap that already exists between Black women and Black men as well as other races and gender. But Black women can’t end the wage gap alone. Black women need the support of non-Blacks as well as the higher-ups at companies to revisit their hiring practices in an effort to have a more diverse workplace.

NWLC also suggested that we should “support policies that expand and strengthen federal and state unemployment insurance programs; expand access to comprehensive health coverage, including reproductive care; bolster equal pay laws; increase the wages of women in low-paid jobs by raising the minimum wage; protect workers’ ability to join unions and collectively bargain; expand the availability of high-quality, affordable child care; and provide paid family and medical leave.”

Let’s make things inbox official! Sign up for the xoNecole newsletter for daily love, wellness, career, and exclusive content delivered straight to your inbox.

Featured image by Getty Images

 

RELATED

 
ALSO ON XONECOLE
5 Things To Tap Into For 'UnPrisoned' Season 2

This article is sponsored by Hulu.

UnPrisonedhas returned for its highly anticipated second season, delving deeper into the complex dynamics of the Alexander family.

The series premiere comes a year after its debut season garnered rave reviews from fans and critics and earned record-breaking ratings for Hulu's Onyx Collective brand. UnPrisoned's success can be attributed to its raw, relatable themes and comedic appeal.

KEEP READINGShow less
Wealthy Restaurant Owner Shares The Money-Saving Hack She’s Used Since Childhood

“It doesn’t matter how big or small your finances are, the real gem is prioritizing what you have,” that’s the candor advice Ebony Austin, owner of Noveau Bar and Grill made sure she emphasized in our authentic convo. As a multi-hyphenated go-getter, she’s created more than 100 job opportunities and given away over $100 million to the community. When I inquired about her secret, she simply credits her skill to proper planning and a trusted team.

KEEP READINGShow less
LATEST POSTS