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How Do You Repair The Damage After A Friend Fight? 5 ‘Insecure’ Fans Sound-Off

The biggest breakup of 2020 has us all in our feelings.

Culture & Entertainment

It took me several days to recover from Issa and Molly's epic friend breakup at the block party (tbh, I still have PTSD every time I think about it). So, it's only right this week's episode of Insecure turned things down a few notches and took us through the aftermath of the situation.

Spoiler alert…

This episode picks up the very next day after the block party blowup. We see Issa go through all the motions to get over her fight with Molly by trying to distract herself with some coronavirus-level home cleaning, a paint and sip that turns into a dine and dash, and few other good doings gone awry. At the end of the episode, she finds herself literally facing Molly sitting inside their favorite Ethopian eatery. Instead, of confronting her though, she decides to walk away.

The real-life Nathan played by actor, Kendrick Sampson, summed it up best for me with his tweet above. While I'm telling my friends how I'm stressed AF waiting for Issa and Molly to just say all the things they need to say to each other, I'm also an Issa Dee. Meaning, I avoid confrontation like it's the 'rona, especially when I'm hurt by the situation. In order to reconcile, it takes vulnerability and being able to verbalize your point without losing your cool—these are not my strong suits. I need time to gather myself together and sometimes even the perfect opportunity presents itself, if I'm not ready I'll retreat. In short, if the other party involved is waiting for me to speak up, they're going to be waiting a LONG time.

My advice from experience: Don't be an Issa Dee.

We have yet to get Molly's POV, which looks like (from the preview) it's coming next week, so I can't tell you whether or not to follow her lead but I did reach out to some Insecure fans to ask:

How do you repair the damage after a friend fight? Do you break the ice or wait for the other person to?

Taking Responsibility For Your Part Is The First Step

"In the past, when I've had an argument with a friend that caused us to not speak for a while, she invited me out to dinner to apologize and hash things out. I think taking responsibility for your words and actions is the first step to reconciling with a friend after a fight.

"If neither person does that, then I don't really see how you can move on and have a healthy friendship, if you even had one at all.

"In my experience, people lose friendships because no one thinks they're wrong or they're waiting for the other person to reach out to them. If you value the person and love them, just reach out. If you have a friendship like Molly and Issa's, then I think there's a chance to reconcile if the two people come with an open heart and take responsibility for their part in the disruption of the friendship." –Ayana Gotay

Sometimes You Will Have To Humble Yourself

"Repairing a friendship after a fight can be tricky. Sometimes you need to clear your head space, give yourself a day or two. But don't let too much time pass because, like Kelli said, the longer you wait the harder it is to fix. If the friendship is important to you, sometimes you will have to humble yourself and apologize or at least open the door for a conversation to be had with a simple 'hello, can we talk' text or call." –AmiyahDeziire, Author, Midnight Confessions

Talk About It Over A Bite To Eat

"I know myself and it usually takes me about two days to get over something. If you were really my friend, I'm going to hit you up and ask you, 'Are you hungry?' If the answer is 'yes', then let's go get something to eat and hash it out." –Marco Cayetano, Sales, Vast Auto

Life Is Too Short To Be Carrying Beefs

"[I have] zero problem being the bigger man. [I'm] way too old and life is too short be to carrying beefs at this point in my life. A quick text or a call; whatever's gonna get the job done. Nine of out ten [times], the issue isn't even that serious and is a result of a misunderstanding. So, my advice to everyone is don't let issues linger and squash the beef and get to the [root of the] problem." –Nagier Chambers, YouTuber, Big Gold Belt Media

No Half-Ass Apology… We Are Meeting Face To Face

"To be honest, if I was Issa I would confront Molly (maybe not the next day, way too soon) but I would get my thoughts together and replay everything in my head that went wrong. I would ask myself, 'What did I do/what did I say/when did I start feeling some type of way?' I would hold myself accountable for my actions, therefore I can understand where the other person is coming from. I would also get a second opinion, because that individual can put into perspective the cause of the fight.

"The phrase 'it's not you, it's me' could be the main reason for the argument.

"Molly and Issa could be fighting personal demons and insecurities within themselves, that don't pertain to their friendship. Regarding repairing a relationship/friendship, everyone involved has to give 100%. No half-ass apology, we are meeting face to face, we are communicating efficiently, and comprehending thoroughly. And if it's worth fighting for, you will find a way to reconcile, and move forward." –Kateri Fischer, On-Air Scheduling Coordinator, BET Networks

Featured image via Insecure/HBO

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