Quantcast
Money Tips To Keep Your Children In Check During Quarantine
Image via Shutterstock

Money Tips To Keep Your Children In Check During Quarantine

TIffany 'The Budgetnista' Aliche talks new children's book and how parents can cope during COVID-19.

Finance

OK, we know. It's rough out there y'all---especially for parents. The financial impact of COVID-19 is undeniable, with homeschooling still a thing and more money being budgeted for home-cooked meals or delivery. When you're not juggling Zoom calls, mediating sibling squabbles, screaming "Stop wasting toilet paper," or side-eyeing progress reports from your child's online teacher, you're probably worried about how you're even going to manage yet another masked trip to the store to pay for that last bag of overpriced veggies or organic chips left on the shelf.

And don't get us started on the utterly depressing and total kill-joy of unemployment. For those who might have been part of a downsizing or layoff, it's gotten even rougher.

Parents, we feel your pain, and we're with you. What better time than now to get a little relief and teach your children the value of money via an expert. Tiffany "The Budgetnista" Aliche, a former preschool teacher who has helped thousands of adults reach their financial goals and get out of debt, is getting back to her roots. Through storytelling, Aliche's new book, Happy Birthday Mali More, showcases why early financial education is important.

"I thought it was time for parents and teachers to have a tool that they can bring into a classroom or their homes to teach financial education for children," Aliche said in an xoNecole interview. "Every book has questions and activities you can do to extend the financial lessons."

Courtesy of Tiffany Aliche

Aliche practiced things with her students that many parents can incorporate today while working from home and spending more time with their families. "The children would ask financial questions like whether I would buy them things or why they couldn't have certain things, so I started playing around with what would be age-appropriate financial education for children as young as three," she explained. "We would do things like create savings banks out of shoe boxes, and I started paying them Monopoly money for doing certain tasks in the classroom." She would also allow the children to buy items from a classroom store stocked with things she bought from Dollar Tree.

"I wanted to show them how money was used. We'd also do penny drives, where I could show them what it looked like to donate and be of service to the community. We'd add the pennies up every two weeks or so, and talk about the money we saved, what we would do with it, and who we would help."

Courtesy of Tiffany Aliche

Times are tough right now, but many are learning financial lessons that will have an impact far beyond the current crisis. By making money talks relatable and enjoyable, children can learn lessons today that can serve them even in adulthood. Taking the time to do activities or include your children in money decisions can be a necessary distraction from daily WFH pressures or even pose opportunities for bonding moments.

"Make it fun. When children are little, it's hard to retain information that's not really fun for them. [Don't make it] feel like a chore," Aliche advises.

"In my classroom, the kids were already doing jobs, so it was relevant to them. [They would know], OK, I have this job at school---I put away the blocks every day--but then they got paid pretend money to do so. Being paid made the lesson deeper. So now, when you go food shopping, you might say to your five-year-old, 'Let's talk about the budget for what you want. I know you have that cereal you like, so here's your budget for that.'"

And in today's stressful time of "Mommy can I have that," or "Ma, why can't we have an extra bowl of that?" practicing patience and consistent discipline is key. "If you say something one time, it doesn't guarantee that they're going to understand and know it," Aliche adds. "Consistently weave financial education into your daily life."

For more of Tiffany, follow her on Instagram. Purchase her book Happy Birthday Mali More at MaliMore.com.

Featured image by Shutterstock

What 14 People Say 'Great Sex' Means To Them

What is the difference between bad, average, and great sex? If I ask thirty people this question, I would get thirty different answers. As someone who's had their fair share of both good and not-so-good sex, I understand that there is no one size fits all answer to this question. "Great sex" can mean different things to different people. Case in point, I once had an amazing sexual experience with a guy that a mutual “friend” had a horrible experience with. Great sex is subjective AF! According to the mutual friend his sex was subpar at best. One person’s trash is another one’s treasure. Great sex boils down to what is good for you and your partner at the moment. No two people are the same so no two sexual experiences will be the same either.

Keep reading...Show less
The daily empowerment fix you need.
Make things inbox official.
Halle Bailey On The Revolutionary Act Of Wearing Her Locs As Ariel

When the trailer for The Little Mermaid dropped, everyone finally got to see Halle Bailey as Ariel. Black women and girls raved over the singer/ actress’s beauty as the beloved character while she belted out the Disney classic song “Part of Your World.” And one of the most noticeable things that many fans pointed out was that the character’s red hair was made of locs.

Keep reading...Show less
5 Times Megan Thee Stallion & Pardison Fontaine Showed Their Love On The 'Gram

Another day, another photo of Megan Thee Stallion that went viral. But this time she had a little help from her boyfriend Pardison “Pardi” Fontaine. The “Pressurelicious” artist’s fans were in for a surprise a few days ago after Megan posted a photo of herself lying on the floor with her legs up and wrapped around Pardi’s waist. Pardi appeared to be focused on playing his video game while Meg’s derriere was tooted in the air but he managed to wrap his arms around it as he held the controller.

Keep reading...Show less
The Mamie 'Till' Movie Wants To Empower Us

Sitting in the theater getting ready to watch Nopefor the third time, I was excited, like a good film nerd, to see my friend's first-time reactions to the fun UFO horror-comedy. My heart sank immediately when a trailer for the film Till, which follows the life and legacy of Emmett Till's mother, Mamie, started playing first.

My knee-jerk reaction, of course, comes from years of watching film and TV that have exploited Black trauma onscreen and were created with little (if any) consideration for what could emotionally trigger the Black audience. The 1955 murder of Emmett Till is so heartbreaking and inherently violent; would this film make us live through that violence on screen?

Fortunately, no!

This week, before watching Gina Prince-Bythewood's incredible The Woman King, a featurette for Till played in place of a trailer and it soothed my fears.

"There will be no physical violence against Black people on screen," the film's award-winning director and co-writer Chinonye Chukwu says in the featurette. "I'm not interested in relishing in that kind of physical trauma. We're going to begin and end in a place of joy," she says.

Starring Danielle Deadwyler (whose heartfelt performance on HBO's Station Eleven stole the show) as Mamie, Till is a celebration of Mamie's tireless activism which sparked the civil rights movement that continues today and ultimately culminated in President Biden signing the Emmett Till Anti-Lynching Act into law just a few months ago in March 2022. "Mamie Till Mobley is a hero," says Alana Mayo, president of Orion Pictures, the production company behind the film. "I'm really, really committed to making movies not just by us, but for us," Mayo says in the featurette.

After a private screening of Till, this week, Trayvon Martin's mother, Sybrina Fulton, tweeted that the film was "#Powerful" and "a must see."

Mamie's story of courage in the face of unspeakable tragedy deserves to be told--especially as we continue the fight for civil rights today. Knowing that the Black filmmakers behind the film are centering Black joy and aiming for our empowerment through the film makes a world of difference.

TILLis in theaters October 14.

Let’s make things inbox official! Sign up for the xoNecole newsletter for daily love, wellness, career, and exclusive content delivered straight to your inbox.



"

Exclusive Interviews
Latest Posts