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Only Have 72 Hours In Mexico City? Here's What You Should Do.
Courtesy of Dominique Jackson

Only Have 72 Hours In Mexico City? Here's What You Should Do.

Make the most of your visit to the "Paris of Latin America."

Travel

I've been a digital nomad for six months now, with the goal to travel full-time for one year. Out of all the places I've visited, Mexico City is by far my favorite place to stay in Mexico. I originally planned to stay there for one month, but that quickly turned into a three-month stay as I fell more in love with the city.


Once, when I was on a free walking tour, the guide described Mexico City as the "Paris of Latin America." While I've never visited Paris, I could see what she meant. Mexico City is romantic, vibrant, bustling, urban, and charming. There are many neighborhoods to explore and endless food to taste.

It always feels like there is never enough time, but here's what you should do if you only have 72 hours in the city.

What to Do in Mexico City: Day 1

Chapultepec Lake in Mexico City in Chapultepec Park

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In The Morning:

Before you make a cup of coffee, head outside to one of the many juice stands. These fresh juice stands are literally on every block, and you can have a cup of fresh pineapple, kale, or mango juice for about $1 and start your morning off energized. After visiting the juice stand, head to Panadería Rosetta for breakfast outside on the patio. My tip is to try the guava pastry. After eating, stroll through the neighborhood Roma Norte for shopping and sightseeing.

In The Afternoon:

Spend the afternoon getting lost in Chapultepec Park, the largest urban park in Latin America. It's comparable to Central Park in New York (though double its size). Inside the park, you'll find museums, lakes, a botanical garden, and plenty of street food. There is also the Chapultepec Castle, and you can go to the top of the castle for a nice aerial view of the park.

At Night:

After you spend the day running around the city, it's time for an excellent nightcap. Mexico City has no shortage of nightlife. Visit one of the many rooftops. Make sure to make a reservation, no matter where you go, but a few I enjoy are Toledo Rooftop or Supra Roma.

What to Do in Mexico City: Day 2

In The Morning:

Now that it's day two, hopefully, you've adjusted to the city just a bit. I fell in love quickly with Mexico City. One place you can't miss for either breakfast or brunch is Niddo Cafe. This charming eatery is in the Juarez neighborhood. The food is savory, and the atmosphere is unique. I had a glass of white wine and avocado toast when I went.

In The Afternoon:

If it's Sunday, I suggest bike riding throughout the city. Every Sunday, the city shuts down the main streets in Paseo de la Reforma for runners and cyclists from roughly 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The best part is that you can rent a bike for free via the tents set up along the route, on a first-come, first-serve basis. If it's not a Sunday, spend the day exploring one of Mexico's unique museums. My favorite is the Frida Kahlo Museum in Coyoacan. Down the street from that museum is the Coyoacan Market. The Soumaya Museum is also a must-see and it's free.

At Night:

Indulge in a delicious churro. There are shops everywhere in Mexico City, with one of the best being El Moro. Have a churro, a cup of something warm, and spend the night relaxing from a busy day.

What to Do in Mexico City: Day 3

Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City

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In The Morning:

Wake up early because it's time for a day trip to the Floating Gardens of Xochimilco. It's about a 45-minute Uber drive from the city, and when I went the Uber only cost about $15! The floating canals are a fun way to spend the day drinking, eating, and dancing. There are speakers on the boat, so you can plug in your music and enjoy the day.

In The Afternoon:

After returning home, be sure to explore Centro. This bustling downtown area is a must-see. You can view the old ruins, schedule a free walking tour, and get a bite at one of the many bakeries that line the street. My tip would be to head to the top of Cafe Don Porfirio for the best of Palacio de Bellas Artes.

At Night:

While Mexico is known for its street food, don't overlook the fine dining experiences that the city offers. I would spend the last night having a fancy dinner at Pujol. Be sure to make a reservation in advance, as it is always packed.

Featured image via Instagram/dominiquejackson