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Join Us For Our Own The Shift Virtual Wellness Event

2021 is the year to fuel power into our intentions and dreams.

Wellness

Are you ready to scale up your life and step into your full power in 2021? xoNecole presents #OwnTheShift, a free virtual toast to embracing the space between who you are and who you're becoming. In partnership with Facebook and Instagram Reels, #OwnTheShift is hosted by multi-talented entertainment journalist Gia Peppers with special guests on topics ranging from money management to wellness to finding your voice. In cultivating this online space, #OwnTheShift will share tangible and inspiring takeaways to channel the readiness to step fully into owning the next transition of self and wealth.

2020 was a year unparalleled and for many of us, a year that brought forth many revelations on what does and doesn't serve us. 2021 is the year to fuel power into our intentions and dreams.

Through this intentional program, women will learn the ingredients on how to level up in how we speak, manage, stretch, empower and heal; both ourselves and each other. To "own the shift" is to possess a curiosity within yourself, the courage to not ignore what you discover, and the unshakeable faith to stand firm in what you need to get what you want in life. From the comfort of your own home and, for free, you can tune into the wise teachings of experts across a bevy of industries. Below you'll find a rundown of the panelists, topics, and times to tune in!

The event will start at 11 AM EST and you can register for your free ticket here!

SHIFT Yourself with Wellness Strategist Toni Jones

An intentional course on the importance of self-talk and how we speak to and over ourselves. In this session, we will learn how Toni Jones owned her shift into a new genre of music through mastering the keys to positive self-talk and trusting your path. Here attendees will leave having a better grasp on how to create mental campaigns to shift their negative narratives and amplify personal affirmations through the understanding of their subconscious-design.

SHIFT Your Pockets with Money Expert Tonya Rapley

Money management is a fundamental part of one's success and necessary to level up. Through this segment, financial specialist Tonya Rapley will demystify the concepts of saving, budgeting, and investing in a series of practical steps to see immediate financial confidence and growth even during these global transitions.

SHIFT Your Wellness with Health Advocate Phyllicia Bonano

The pandemic has directly altered the idea of work-life balance - between Zoom meetings, demanding hours, and personal responsibilities. Yoga guru and certified Reiki practitioner Phyllicia Bonano has mastered the practice of starting where you are and extending grace to your body. For OTS, she will teach attendees a series of stretches and breathwork exercises to reset the mind, body, and spirit from wherever you are.

Q+A with Dr. Jess 

In conversation with Dr. Jess and Lalah Deliah together - the two will discuss how they have come to understand internal power (spiritual and emotional) while tapping into our superpowers. Through accepting our gift, getting out of our comfort zone, operating in love, and doing the work in the midst of a radical shift, we can truly move into our purpose.

SHIFT Your Vibration with Lalah Delia + Gia Peppers 

A vulnerable conversation on beauty and weighted discoveries that come from shifting and learning to vibrate higher. Lalah and Gia will share personal stories, challenges, and realizations of their journey over the last year.

OWN THE SHIFT Meditation + Sound with Phyllicia and Toni 

A moment of stillness to reaffirm the wisdom shared, this session will bring forth higher vibrations as the attendees tap into stillness, spirit, and sound.

If you haven't already, make sure you register for our free virtual event by clicking here and get ready to Own The SHIFT for 2021 and beyond!

Featured image by Shutterstock

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That memory came back to me after a flier went viral last week, advertising an abstinence event titled The Close Your Legs Tour with the specific target demo of teen girls came across my Twitter timeline. The event was met with derision online. Writer, artist, and professor Ashon Crawley said: “We have to refuse shame. it is not yours to hold. legs open or not.” Writer and theologian Candice Marie Benbow said on her Twitter: “Any event where 12-17-year-old girls are being told to ‘keep their legs closed’ is a space where purity culture is being reinforced.”

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I grew up in an explicitly evangelical house and church, where I was taught virginity was the best gift a girl can hold on to until she got married. I fortunately never wore a purity ring or had a ceremony where I promised my father I wouldn’t have pre-marital sex. I certainly never even thought of having my hymen examined and the certificate handed over to my father on my wedding day as “proof” that I kept my promise. But the culture was always present. A few years after that chocolate-flavored indoctrination, I was introduced to the fabled car anecdote. “Boys don’t like girls who have been test-driven,” as it goes.

And I believed it for a long time. That to be loved and to be desired by men, it was only right for me to deny myself my own basic human desires, in the hopes of one day meeting a man that would fill all of my fantasies — romantically and sexually. Even if it meant denying my queerness, or even if it meant ignoring how being the only Black and fat girl in a predominantly white Christian space often had me watch all the white girls have their first boyfriends while I didn’t. Something they don’t tell you about purity culture – and that it took me years to learn and unlearn myself – is that there are bodies that are deemed inherently sinful and vulgar. That purity is about the desire to see girls and women shrink themselves, make themselves meek for men.

Purity culture isn’t unlike rape culture which tells young girls in so many ways that their worth can only be found through their bodies. Whether it be through promiscuity or chastity, young girls are instructed on what to do with their bodies before they’ve had time to figure themselves out, separate from a patriarchal lens. That their needs are secondary to that of the men and boys in their lives.

It took me a while —after leaving the church and unlearning the toxic ideals around purity culture rooted in anti-Blackness, fatphobia, heteropatriarchy, and queerphobia — to embrace my body, my sexuality, and my queerness as something that was not only not sinful or dirty, but actually in line with the vision God has over my life. Our bodies don't stop being our temples depending on who we do or who we don’t let in, and our worth isn’t dependent on the width of our legs at any given point.

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