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Wellness

Black Girl's Healing House Founder Schools Us On The Soft Life

The strong Black woman trope has had us in a chokehold for years but a new movement has been overtaking our social media feeds as the cure, the soft life. Since the soft life has become a trending topic, there have been many misconceptions about the term and what it truly means to live softly. The founder of Black Girl's Healing House, Delilah Antionette, promotes this innovative way of thinking in her popular Facebook group and even sees it as a form of wellness.


If you are wanting to manifest a soft life in 2023, Delilah has the perfect tips for you. xoNecole spoke with the wellness entrepreneur about being a Black woman in the holistic space, creating a platform for Black women to feel seen, and how you can join the soft life.

xoNecole: Tell us a little about yourself and how Black Girl’s Healing House started.

Delilah Antionette: I started my healing journey a few years ago after I graduated from college. I was struggling with anxiety and depression and finding mental healthcare was difficult for me. I ran into challenges such as affordability and cultural competency so I turned to holistic wellness. I got into crystals, the chakra system, yoga, self-development, and astrology.

But, I found that in the wellness industry, there were not many representations of me. I would often be the only Black girl in class, I would get awkward looks and racially profiled. I didn’t necessarily feel safe in these healing spaces.

I hoped that I could also find a community while I was on this journey but there weren’t any there yet so I created Black Girl’s Healing House-- the Facebook group.

Within years we’ve grown to over 60,000 Black women around the world who are also on this journey of healing.

xoN: 'Soft life' has been a buzzword in 2022 but there have been many misconceptions about it such as it is seen as a luxury and not a necessity. What is a soft life and what isn’t a soft life?

DA: I see this argument a lot in our community and some would define it as luxury and femininity, and others just do not understand the need for Black women to be soft. I am so for the soft life. I do not wish to ever struggle or get things [muddy.] It’s exhausting.

For me, when I think of the soft life I think of healing. I think about letting go of the version of myself that I created for my survival. And oftentimes when we’ve been through trauma we create tough exteriors to protect us from getting hurt again. I want to be able to be more vulnerable yet have healthy boundaries, I want to have strong bonds with people and I want to be kinder to myself. I want to experience all of the little luxuries that life has to offer and I feel that I can achieve this through softness.

I believe that working towards a soft life is generationally healing. The women in my family could never experience softness and I hate that. I want my children to have that privilege so that they can experience the highest level of their potential.

"When I think of soft life I think of healing. I think about letting go of the version of myself that I created for my survival."

xoN: How does the soft life relate to wellness?

DA: Soft life promotes a healthier way of being. Soft life teaches you to slow down and ground yourself. You learn to stop prioritizing hustling and start prioritizing flow state which can be achieved through self-care. And again healing plays a major role in your ability to have a soft life.

xoN: What are five ways Black women can manifest a soft life in 2023? 

DA: Starting therapy. Self-care. Movement, such as yoga or Pilates. Joining a supportive community. Getting [in tune] with your intuition.

xoN: What does Black Girl’s Healing House have in store for 2023?

DA: Black Girl’s Healing House is working on building our directory of Black female holistic wellness professionals for our community. While admiring our Facebook group, I saw that our members were always in search of holistic therapists, Black girl-friendly yoga classes, and wellness spas and I was so lucky to meet so many healers in our community. So I created a platform where Black women can find culturally competent holistic care.

On our website blackgirlshealinghouse.com you would be able to search for mental health professionals, doulas and midwives, dermatologists, spas, and fitness classes in your local area.

For more of Delilah on Facebook and Instagram @blackgirlshealinghouse.

Feature image courtesy of Delilah Antionette

 

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