Quantcast
Shutterstock

How Many Genders Are There? 11 Gender Terms You Need To Know

Gender is fluid AF.

Human Interest

What is gender? A social construct? Probably. How many genders are there? These days, everyone's talking about gender and at this point we're all having to learn and unlearn what it is that we know about it -- which is a great thing because against all odds curiosity will snuff out ignorance and bigotry (fingers crossed). Gender (especially outside the binary) isn't a dirty word that we have to Google and delete the browser history for, so let's stop acting like it is! We spoke with three sexperts about gender -- Relational and Sex therapist D'Lessia Wedley, Sexologist and entrepreneur Malika O'Neill, and LMFT Graduate intern (concentration in sex ed and therapy) Kalila Griffin. I asked them the same five questions (basically) and here was the consensus:

Gender is fluid AF. And we should learn to be less rigid and more "go with the flow-ish."

But seriously...how many different genders are there? Well. All of our experts agreed that you cannot put a cap on or "quantify" gender. Wedley offers, "I cannot quantify gender. Gender is defined by how one identifies themselves, and the language and terminology are continually evolving. People must be aware that there is a difference between one's sex and gender. Sex is the biological makeup or medical terminology of a person, and gender being how one views themselves."

media4.giphy.com

Furthermore, Griffin points out defining gender is not that simple given that "language related to trans and gender non-conforming (TGNC) individuals is always evolving."

O'Neill elaborates on the complexity saying, "Scientifically one may say there are only two genders, man and woman. Those who exist outside these groups fall under the umbrella term non-binary or genderqueer. However, the truth is, there's no way to put a final number on how many genders there are because [as previously mentioned] gender is about a person's sense of self, and each individual person is likely to experience gender differently. I have read articles with over 100 genders to [those] claiming there are 4,000."

Though we are accustomed to the binary or the most known, used, and offered gender of male and female, here are 11 words to describe various genders and their experience, according to O'Neill: 

  1. Agender: Not having a gender or identifying with a gender. They may describe themselves as being gender neutral or genderless.
  2. Bigender: A person who fluctuates between traditionally "male" and "female" gender-based behaviours and identities.
  3. Cisgender: A person whose gender identity and biological sex assigned at birth are the same. For example, they were born biologically as a male, and express their gender as male.
  4. Gender Fluid: A mix of boy and girl. A person who is gender fluid may always feel like a mix of the two traditional genders, but may feel more "man" some days, and more "woman" other days.
  5. Genderqueer: A gender identity label often used by people who do not identify with being a man or a woman, or as an umbrella term for many gender non-conforming or non-binary identities.
  6. Intersex: A person born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn't seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male. For example, a person might be born appearing to be female on the outside, but having mostly male-typical anatomy on the inside.
  7. Gender Variant: Someone who either by nature or by choice does not conform to gender-based expectations of society.
  8. Mx: Is a title (e.g. Mr., Ms., etc.) that is gender neutral. Pronounced miks, (similar to Ms) it is often the option of choice for folks who do not identify as cisgender.
  9. Third Gender: A term for a person who does not identify with either man or woman, but identifies with another gender. This gender category is used by societies that recognize three or more genders, both contemporary and historic, and is also a conceptual term meaning different things to different people who use it.
  10. Transgender: A person who lives as a member of a gender other than that expected based on sex assigned at birth.
  11. Two-Spirit: Is an umbrella term traditionally used by Native-American people to recognize individuals who possess qualities of both genders.
Are you a member of our insiders squad? Join us in the xoTribe Members Community today!

Featured image by Shutterstock

It's great to check a few of the tried-and-true popular U.S. and global locales off your travel wish list, but it's even better to add a few other spots that are not quite as overpopulated with tourists. You can create a few unique memories and get those IG moments that don't seem so overdone or cliche while exploring a different part of a country.

Keep reading...Show less
The daily empowerment fix you need.
Make things inbox official.

For some time now, the Human Design System has been picking up mainstream traction! And like so many other explorative journeys, the concept of Human Design took off via social media. Similar to Astrology, Human Design requires your birth time and date, and it also provides a map of sorts to help you navigate this world with purpose while being uniquely you (and tapping into your purpose). In fact, if you desire, the information can work simultaneously with Astrology.

Keep reading...Show less

The more Saweetie prioritizes her mental health, the more gems she drops in the process. The “Icy Chain” rapper has been open in the past about her mental health struggles due to being overworked and not properly taking care of herself. After having a few mental breakdowns, she has been on a mission to put her health first and focus on self-care.

Keep reading...Show less

Black women have been redefining what wellness looks like since the beginning of time. (I even have a real-life, sassy, still-walking-signifying-driving-gardening example of this via my own 92-year-old Granny, who is the epitome of manifestation and self-preservation, as she has always defined wellness on her own terms.) We continue to shift the narrative, especially when it comes to what "wellness" actually means as a Black woman in a world where it can be so hard to simply exist in fullness.

Keep reading...Show less

We all know what it is to love, be loved, or be in love – or at least we think we do. But what would you say if I were to tell you that so much of the love that you thought you’d been in was actually a little thing called limerence? No, it doesn’t sound as romantic – and it’s not – unless you’re into the whole Obsessed-type of love. But one might say at least one side of that dynamic might be…thrilling.

Keep reading...Show less
Exclusive Interviews
Latest Posts