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Here's Why This Black Woman-Owned Feminine Hygiene Brand Is Trending

The Honey Pot's pages were flooded with hundreds of negative reviews. Those reviews doubled their sales.

Culture & Entertainment

Beatrice Dixon wanted a seat at the table, so she built one with the launch of her plant-based, feminine hygiene company in 2014 that has since gained the attention of major retailers like Whole Foods and Target.

But for every table where there is bread broken, there will be less than grateful spectators with an opinion you probably didn't ask for. That's exactly what happened to Beatrice when The Honey Pot's 30-second advertisement for Target's "Founder's We Believe In" segment dropped and all hell broke loose.

In the ad, the entrepreneur made an important argument for the funding of Black woman-owned businesses that went a little something like this:

"The reason why it's so important for Honey Pot to do well is so that the next black girl that comes up with a great idea, she can have a better opportunity. That means a lot to me."

The statement, one that was seemingly triggering to a number of politically correct Patty's, later inspired a number of Internet trolls to flood the company's Trust Pilot page with negative, inaccurate comments about the company that did not go unnoticed by Black Twitter, who came to The Honey Pot's defense expeditiously.

Up until now, the company had not made an official statement about the controversy, but Beatrice recently sat down with ESSENCE to reveal that she is not only aware of the commercial's backlash, but she's totally here for it. In response to the company's recent influx of negative comments, the business owner had this to say:

"I wasn't necessarily blindsided [by the negative reactions], but I also didn't have an expectation. This was not Honey Pot's commercial, it was Target's commercial. It was shot during Black History Month and for Women's History Month. They chose that particular clip for a reason. I'm here for that story and that's why I said it. I know that there's a huge disparity when you look at the funding of businesses. I'm always going to be a proponent of us doing what we have to do so this isn't even a conversation. The only thing we as Black women business owners can do is make really successful businesses."

As the first and only Black-woman owned feminine care system that's powered by plants, Honey Pot's website says that their hygiene products are made "for humans with vaginas, by humans with vaginas" and if that isn't inclusion, I don't know what is. Featuring three unique systems and a number of feminine care projects catered to your body's specific needs, The Honey Pot just gave us an excuse to toss our Tampax and support a Black-owned business in the process.

Since the controversy, Bossip and Buzzfeed reported that the company's sales have DOUBLED, proving that every attempt to block your blessing is an opportunity to secure a bag.

Featured image courtesy of The Honey Pot.

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