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How I Healed My Uterine Fibroids The Holistic Way

Women's Health

I never thought I would be writing an article about my personal health issues, let alone one about my journey with uterine fibroids.


My story started three years ago when I had an ultrasound displaying various growths comprised of muscle and fibrous tissue called uterine fibroids. Before the ultrasound, I wasn't familiar with the term "fibroid" and the full extent of damage they may cause. Each year during my annual exam, my doctor would casually mention the growths were harmless and that she will monitor them.

That was until they grew and started occupying my entire precious uterus.

What my doctor conveniently forgot to mention was that if fibroids are present and continue to grow, they eventually have to be removed or treated via a myomectomy (the surgical removal of fibroids only), a hysterectomy (the surgical removal of the entire uterus), or a heavy dose of hormone suppression drugs that have side effects of early menopause.

Fast-forward to January 2016, not surprisingly, I started to have some of the symptoms associated with fibroids like frequent urination, constipation, and abdominal bloating. Waking up in the morning with my stomach resembling a pregnant woman in her final trimester is not my idea of bringing sexy back. This was my official wake-up call and the next day I made an appointment with my gynecologist.

During the examination, the doctor was not alarmed by the current size of my stomach and used medical phrases like, "It's 18 weeks in size." She also shared some of her previous surgeries she performed to remove fibroids. After explaining her prize-winning watermelon-sized fibroid removal story, she proceeded to give me my only two pitiful options: surgery or drugs.

I'm not completely sure why doctors tell patients to treat fibroids like they are a normal occurrence and we have nothing to worry about – when they really should say to us that they actually are and that we actually do. Perhaps, it gives them the green light to perform surgery or prescribe us a new “clinical trial" hormone suppressant drug the pharmaceutical rep bribed them to try out in exchange for a trip to Aruba – but I digress.

What immediately started to replay in my head is the fact that I'm a 36-year-old African-American single female with no kids.

Photo Credit: Carrie Strong

What am I going to do?

Being a woman with a full active life, and feeling that I wanted to "keep my original parts," surgery and taking medicine was not an option for me. So, I kindly told my gynecologist to keep her geeked-up surgery stories to herself and I will see her in one month. At the time, I walked out of the hospital scared and confused af but also determined as hell to shrink the abnormal demons trying to set up shop within my feminine goodies.

My first step was to consult several doctors to get a second and third opinion, only to receive the same response: surgery or drugs. Really???

So, I took matters into my own hands and engulfed myself in research. I found out an alarming statistic: over 80% of women will be diagnosed with fibroids by the age of 50. I wondered why. What is the root cause?

During my research, I stumbled across the key that unlocked my healing. There's a direct correlation between fibroids, the function of your liver, and estrogen imbalance. Basically, the foods we consume play a major part in the development and growth of uterine fibroids. If dietary choices can so drastically impact my fibroid suffering, imagine what simple nutritional changes could do for my body.

From that day forward, I made a conscious decision to not let anything or anyone stand in my way. Operation "Get Healed" was officially in full effect and here's how I did it.

My 7-Step Holistic Regimen

  1. Drastically limit your consumption of simple carbohydrates, refined sugar, and processed foods.
  2. Incorporate organic foods as much as possible. Food packed with hormones, specifically meat, feed the fibroid.
  3. Juice beets, spinach, kale, ginger, and turmeric daily to detox the liver. Also add fresh turmeric to your juice and tea. Likewise, you can take 3 or more turmeric capsule 3x daily. This will decrease inflammation and stop excessive bleeding and pain. I add raw turmeric to my dandelion root tea every day.
  4. Take an active dose of systemic enzymes 3x daily. My dosage consists of 12 pills daily (6 in the morning and 6 at night). This has aided tremendously in dissolving my fibroids.
  5. Exercise a minimum of 30 mins daily four to five times a week.
  6. Avoid consuming anything packaged in plastic. Bottled water is the major culprit of estrogen imbalance.
  7. THE MOST EFFECTIVE TREATMENT: Do castor oil packs every other day. I use Jamaican black castor oil by Island Tropic. Click here for more information on what castor oil can do for your fibroids.

Bonus Tip: Weight control and diet helped to decrease the fibroids. A diet that limits red meat and is rich in green leafy vegetables, fruit, and fish is VERY beneficial. Some of my favorite elimination guides can be found on gochefahki.com and fibroidelimination.com.

So where am I now?

Well, I'm happy to report that after a month of delving into my holistic practices, the fibroids have decreased significantly in size and my symptoms are almost non-existent. Incorporating a fibroid elimination regimen has been my saving grace. But I must confess, it's not easy and dedication along with consistency is KEY!!!!

Photo Credit: Carrie Strong

My regimen might be considered drastic but my goal is to live a FULL life fibroid-free. In retrospect, being diagnosed was a definite eye-opener and a blessing in disguise. I now live a conscious lifestyle and I am completely aware of the foods I consume and the chemicals my body is exposed to on a daily basis. I'm excited to be on the road to recovery and feeling like myself again! More importantly, I am here to provide hope to women dealing with the same issue and offer encouragement through writing this post.

Like myself, you can take full control over your health and walk into a new life healed!

*Originally published on velvetlope.com

Eureka Calhoun is the owner and operator of Velvet Lope Styling, LLC. Velvet Lope Styling is a wardrobe styling and image consulting company dedicated to the modern day man and woman looking to upgrade their visual presentation through expert styling. Follow her on her social media platforms @velvetlope and @qrushvelvet and visit her website velvetlope.com.

Photos courtesy of Eureka Calhoun; featured image by Getty Images

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You may not know her by Elisabeth Ovesen – writer and host of the love, sex and relationships advice podcast Asking for a Friend. But you definitely know her other alter ego, Karrine Steffans, the New York Times best-selling author who lit up the literary and entertainment world when she released what she called a “tell some” memoir, Confessions of a Video Vixen.

Her 2005 barn-burning book gave an inside look at the seemingly glamorous world of being a video vixen in the ‘90s and early 2000s, and exposed the industry’s culture of abuse, intimidation, and misogyny years before the Me Too Movement hit the mainstream. Her follow-up books, The Vixen Diaries (2007) and The Vixen Manual: How To Find, Seduce And Keep The Man You Want (2009) all topped the New York Times best-seller list. After a long social media break, she's back. xoNecole caught up with Ovesen about the impact of her groundbreaking book, what life is like for her now, and why she was never “before her time”– everyone else was just late to the revolution.

xoNecole: Tell me about your new podcast Asking for a Friend with Elisabeth Ovesen and how that came about.

Elisabeth Ovesen: I have a friend who is over [at Blavity] and he just asked me if I wanted to do something with him. And that's just kinda how it happened. It wasn't like some big master plan. Somebody over there was like, “Hey, we need content. We want to do this podcast. Can you do it?” And I was like, “Sure.” And that's that. That was around the holidays and so we started working on it.

xoNecole: Your life and work seem incredibly different from when you first broke out on the scene. Can you talk a bit about the change in your career and how your life is now?

EO: Not that different. I mean my life is very different, of course, but my work isn't really that different. My life is different, of course, because I'm 43. My career started when I was in my 20s, so we're looking at almost 20 years since the beginning of my career. So, naturally life has changed a lot since then.

I don’t think my career has changed a whole lot – not as far as my writing is concerned, and my stream of consciousness with my writing, and my concerns and the subject matter hasn’t changed much. I've always written about interpersonal relationships, sexual shame, male ego fragility, respectability politics – things like that. I always put myself in the center of that to make those points, which I think were greatly missed when I first started writing. I think that society has changed quite a bit. People are more aware. People tell me a lot that I have always been “before my time.” I was writing about things before other people were talking about that; I was concerned about things before my generation seemed to be concerned about things. I wasn't “before my time.” I think it just seems that way to people who are late to the revolution, you know what I mean?

I retired from publishing in 2015, which was always the plan to do 10 years and retire. I was retired from my pen name and just from the business in general in 2015, I could focus on my business, my education and other things, my family. I came back to writing in 2020 over at Medium. The same friend that got me into the podcast, actually as the vice president of content over at Medium and was like, “Hey, we need some content.” I guess I’m his go-to content creator.

xoNecole: Can you expound on why you went back to your birth name versus your stage name?

EO: No, it was nothing to expound upon. I mean, writers have pen names. That’s like asking Diddy, why did he go by Sean? I didn't go back. I've always used that. Nobody was paying attention. I've never not been myself. Karrine Steffans wrote a certain kind of book for a certain kind of audience. She was invented for the urban audience, particularly. She was never meant to live more than 10 years. I have other pen names as well. I write under several names. So, the other ones are just nobody's business right now. Different pen names write different things. And Elisabeth isn’t my real name either. So you'll never know who I really am and you’ll never know what my real name is, because part of being a writer is, for me at least, keeping some sort of anonymity. Anything I do in entertainment is going to amass quite a bit because who I am as a person in my private life isn't the same a lot of times as who I am publicly.

xoNecole: I want to go back to when you published Confessions of a Video Vixen. We are now in this time where people are reevaluating how the media mistreated women in the spotlight in the 2000s, namely women like Britney Spears. So I’d be interested to hear how you feel about that period of your life and how you were treated by the media?

EO: What I said earlier. I think that much of society has evolved quite a bit. When you look back at that time, it was actually shocking how old-fashioned the thinking still was. How women were still treated and how they're still treated now. I mean, it hasn't changed completely. I think that especially for the audience, I think it was shocking for them to see a woman – a woman of color – not be sexually ashamed.

I hate being like other people. I don't want to do what anyone else is doing. I can't conform. I will not conform. I think in 2005 when Confessions was published, that attitude, especially about sex, was very upsetting. Number one, it was upsetting to the men, especially within urban and hip-hop culture, which is built on misogyny and thrives off of it to this day. And the women who protect these men, I think, you know, addressing a demographic that is rooted in trauma that is rooted in sexual shame, trauma, slavery of all kinds, including slavery of the mind – I think it triggered a lot of people to see a Black woman be free in this way.

I think it said a lot about the people who were upset by it. And then there were some in “crossover media,” a lot of white folks were upset too, not gonna lie. But to see it from Black women – Tyra Banks was really upset [when she interviewed me about Confessions in 2005]. Oprah wasn't mad [when she interviewed me]. As long as Oprah wasn’t mad, I was good. I didn't care what anybody else had to say. Oprah was amazing. So, watching Black women defend men, and Black women who had a platform, defend the sexual blackmailing of men: “If you don't do this with me, you won't get this job”; “If you don't do this in my trailer, you're going to have to leave the set”– these are things that I dealt with.

I just happened to be the kind of woman who, because I was a single mother raising my child all by myself and never got any help at all – which I still don't. Like, I'm 24 in college – not a cheap college either – one of the best colleges in the country, and I'm still taking care of him all by myself as a 21-year-old, 20-year-old, young, single mother with no family and no support – I wasn’t about to say no to something that could help me feed my son for a month or two or three.

xoNecole: We are in this post-Me Too climate where women in Hollywood have come forward to talk about the powerful men who have abused them. In the music industry in particular, it seems nearly impossible for any substantive change or movement to take place within music. It's only now after three decades of allegations that R. Kelly has finally been convicted and other men like Russell Simmons continue to roam free despite the multiple allegations against him. Why do you think it's hard for the music industry to face its reckoning?

EO: That's not the music industry, that's urban music. That’s just Black folks who make music and nobody cares about that. That's the thing; nobody cares...Nobody cares. It's not the music industry. It's just an "urban" thing. And when I say "urban," I say that in quotations. Literally, it’s a Black thing, where nobody gives a shit what Black people do to Black people. And Russell didn't go on unchecked, he just had enough money to keep it quiet. But you know, anytime you're dealing with Black women being disrespected, especially by Black men, nobody gives a shit.

And Black people don't police themselves so it doesn't matter. Why should anybody care? And Black women don't care. They'll buy an R. Kelly album right now. They’ll stream that shit right now. They don’t care. So, nobody cares. Nobody cares. And if you're not going to police yourself, then nobody's ever going to care.

xoNecole: Do you have any regrets about anything you wrote or perhaps something you may have omitted?

EO: Absolutely not. No. There's nothing that I wish I would've gone back and said to myself, no. I don’t think at 20-something years old, I'm supposed to understand every little thing. I don't think the 20-something-year-old woman is supposed to understand the world and know exactly what she's doing. I think that one of my biggest regrets, which isn't my regret, but a regret, is that I didn't have better parents. Because a 20-something only knows what she knows based on what she’s seen and what she’s been taught and what she’s told. I had shitty parents and a horrible family. Just terrible. These people had no business having children. None of them. And a lot of our families are like that. And we may pass down those familial curses.

*This interview has been edited and condensed

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Feature image courtesy of Elisabeth Ovesen

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