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The First Black Batwoman, Javicia Leslie Just So Happens To Be Stylish AF
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The First Black Batwoman, Javicia Leslie Just So Happens To Be Stylish AF


Black women have been the unsung heroes in American history for generations and it's about damn time the entertainment industry recognized our power. Black Girl Magic isn't just a trend, issa generational blessing and due to current events that have taken place, we are no longer asking for a seat at the table that our ancestors built––we demand it because knowing your worth is a superpower, one that history's first Black Batwoman, Javicia Leslie, has spent years developing. The actress, who was recently announced as a replacement for Ruby Rose as the lead character on the CW's Batwoman, told Hollywood Reporter:

"This really had nothing to do with me and everything to do with my people and with little Black girls."
"There's not many actors that get this opportunity to play in a world that you can continue to develop and expand on for a decade. This is a great beginning to what I'm sure will be a very long journey."

One of Javicia's many superpowers as TV's newest hero includes the ability to slay effortlessly, and we are taking notes. Here are five photos that prove Javicia Leslie is stylish AF:

Gotham/WireImage

David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Jason Mendez/WireImage

Raymond Hall/GC Images

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Featured image by DFree / Shutterstock.com

 

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