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How Media Correspondent PhaShunta Hubert Used Rejection to Build Her Own Brand

BOSS UP

To an entrepreneur, the word "no" really just means let me figure out how I'm going to make this work. "No" never means that it's not going to happen – just maybe not with you. This is exactly what gave 25-year-old Michigan native PhaShunta Hubert the burning desire to take matters into her own hands to become one of media's youngest correspondents in the game.


Not only is she a maven in her own right, but this force to be reckoned with is also a mom of one and a soon to be graduate of Eastern Michigan University.

At the very beginning of her career, PhaShunta became very familiar with rejection, but didn't let that stop her as she remembered that some of her biggest inspirations were just as familiar with the spirit-crushing "no's" before they became acquainted with success. She had trouble securing mentors, landing internships, and even paid jobs in her field.

When PhaShunta finally landed an intern position, she soon realized that it was nothing like what she had in mind and became determined to pave her own path. She had already begun building her brand but the experience reminded her of her own goals of creating a media empire she could be proud of.

She began interviewing some of the local personalities and eventually branched out to interview more popular big names such as Tyler Perry, Rev. Al Sharpton, Mona Scott Young, Angie Martinez, Keke Palmer, Erica Campbell, Teyana Taylor and many more. Her website missPhaShunta.com did so well that she has since been able to secure features in ESSENCE, Huffington Post, Ebony, and Black Enterprise to name a few.

Her greatest lesson in rejection is that a temporary "no," doesn't mean permanent defeat. "You have to find a way to become motivated by the word 'no' and figure out a way to turn it into a 'YES' because it will happen long as you keep striving for your dreams," PhaShunta explained. "I've also learned to ask the person who told me 'no' for advice on ways I could improve. There's no reason to prolong sadness from rejection and become furious with that person because what's for you will be for you and no one can take that from you."

"What's for you will be for you and no one can take that from you."

She has been so inspired by the "no's" that she launched her own podcast titled "Celebrate Hearing No". The podcast has featured the likes of Matthew Knowles, Yvonne Orji, Dana Chanel, B. Simone and many others. Her goal and mission is to motivate others to inspire and embrace "no" and challenge her listeners to turn it into a big fat "YES!"

PhaShunta credits her success today to family, prayer, and persistence. She also notes that it's important to back your prayers with action and to stay true to your brand and what you initially set out to do. "I wanted people to like my content but I wasn't desperate to where I would step outside of my box being untrue to myself for likes or shares on social media."

Her thick skin has also assisted her in building such an impressive roster of celebrity interviews. PhaShunta says it was hard at first to get in touch with publicists and managers, but once she got the hang of it, things started to fall into place. She was professional, polite, and was always sure to send a follow-up email in the event that the recipients happened to be busy. She was already familiar with having doors closed in her face, so whenever she did encounter a "no" – once again, she was only faced with the question of "How can I turn this into a yes?"

And as a testament to the fact the efficacy of her life's mantra, to this day, Miss PhaShunta has never met a door her tenacity couldn't open.

At the tender age of 25, PhaShunta has made quite a name for herself and believes this is only the beginning. "I always told myself what I do will attract the right people and I'm forever grateful for those who have supported me so far."

For more Miss PhaShunta, follow her on Instagram.

*Featured Image by DDS

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