Quantcast

Eve Takes Off Makeup For The First Time In Public And Reminds Us That It's Sometimes Just A Security Blanket

Celebrity News

"People are so used to seeing you made up that it feels like taking off a mask when you go without makeup."


My insecurity blanket comes in 220M, with enough concealer to hide the scars of teenage angst on my cheeks, and mink eyelashes to seal the beat. Makeup itself isn't an insecurity blanket, but the dependency I developed to create an image for myself; the mask I wore in public was to hide the very parts of who I was - my scars, my imperfections, my minute details - that could help me connect, vulnerably, with others. What don't we let people see? In the question reveals the answer that can bring us a surge of evolution.

In a recent episode of The Talk, rapper and actress Eve blessed the show with her beautiful and bare presence.

During the segment five women on the show revealed what they looked like without makeup, and Eve's testament was not only relatable, but a truth on how we can choose external dependencies to perpetuate the need of upholding an image for ourselves. This image can be so connected to us that when we remove the attachment, we are left to look at ourselves, bare, naked, and vulnerable, in the mirror.

Do we self-identify with this woman? Do we love her just the same? Are we able to treat her gently and kindly without the wardrobe we dressed her in?

"It became a security blanket. I've been in the business most of my life, from a young age. I wore makeup for everything. Every time I was in public I had on makeup and it became like putting on a bra in the morning. I wake up I get dressed I put on a bra I put on makeup. But then also it became something that I guess, I started seeing flaws that I didn't want other people to see. So I was like okay let me cover this up because if someone sees me outside I didn't want to be like 'that's not what she looks like'. I was scared of that, I don't want to be scared of that no more."

Eve's words made me think: more often than not we become habitual in the process of creating a mask because of the perception others will hold of us.

For the professional environments that we inhabit, we are consistently catering to the "mask" we've created. Sometimes, I've felt that showing up to work without makeup is unprofessional.

It made me question if others would notice the lack of upkeep and therefore pull me to the side and ask, "Is everything okay, Olivia Jade?"

As simple as it is to not wear makeup for a day, for those of us who have embedded it into our everyday self-care routine, it's the revealing of what lies beneath that can feel vulnerable. But finding the evolution in the fear, in the baring of our true selves, is what really helps us to grow into our identity and connect with others in their own.

On The Talk, Sheryl Underwood made it a point to only make half of her face up and leave the remaining half bare.

During her confessional, she revealed that the natural side of her face was the woman that built herself up and rooted herself in the authenticity of who she is, and the made-up side was the woman who accepted the bare Sheryl and also enjoyed getting cute for her role.

It was a lesson in duality - that you can exist as the beautiful being you are with or without the wardrobe that you create for yourself.

When I was able to differentiate my need for an insecurity blanket and the innocent desire of enjoying getting dolled up as an act of self-care, I was able to embrace the same lesson that Sheryl touched base on. Knowing the beauty that lies with in, and also knowing the difference between attachment and dependency on one side of the spectrum is maintaining a healthy balance and a healthy relationship with self.

True evolution is deconstructing the idea we have of ourselves to reveal who we truly are to others.

For those of us who have created a mask for ourselves - an image that we need to uphold, whether it be makeup, a persona we've created, or the clothes that we wear - learning how to let go of that blanket in order for us to show others what they don't see connects us on a deeper level than we could imagine.

Catch the candid conversation on The Talk in full below.

You know what? Sometimes, you've got to push a few coins aside and determine in your mind that you're going to invest into your sex life (if you had a sex jar, this would be easier to do, by the way. You can read more about what that is all about here). If you're someone who is totally down to do that, but you don't have a clue where to begin, boy have you come to the right place! Between the joy of being a writer who sometimes gets samples sent to me, the constant research that I do for the couples I work with and having folks shout-out certain items semi-often, I've compiled a list of 12 sex-related items that may seem random AF (a pun is kind of intended there) and, at the same time, can make sex so much better between you and your partner. Where's your pad at? You're definitely gonna wanna take note.

Keep reading... Show less
The daily empowerment fix you need.
Make things inbox official.

Recently, I was talking to a friend of mine about someone who once told me that they had an annual week-long summer rendezvous that lasted for over 15 years with someone else. Yep — this individual would meet up with another person who lived in a different state, solely to have sex for a week straight, and then return to their city as if nothing ever happened. According to them, the only reason why this ritual romp eventually came to an end is because the other person decided to get serious about someone else; however, it wasn't until it ended that the person who told me the story realized how attached they actually had become to their sex partner (a cautionary tale). After I completed my lil' tale, my friend simply said, "Oh, I do that s — t every cuffing season. There are some people who I only talk to around this time of year, we f — k around and then that's that until the season comes around again."

Keep reading... Show less

How We Met is a series where xoNecole talks about love and relationships with real-life couples. We learn how they met, how like turned into love, and how they make their love work.

When it comes to sexuality, there have always been societal limitations centered on what is "acceptable." However, with more honest conversations about how fluid sexuality and sexual expression can be, now there are so many more opportunities for self-exploration and taking back ownership of our identities again. One couple that is living their truth and being sexual beings unapologetically while living and loving their lives are Jasmine Johnson and King Noire.

Keep reading... Show less

I'm so excited because one of my favorite unscripted shows is back. OWN's Ready to Love is a dating series that follows professionals over 30, looking for long-lasting relationships. Hosted by Nephew Tommy, it follows singles who desire true connections and are grouped together to find them.

Keep reading... Show less

Social media influencer and actress Tabitha Brown has garnered viral fame through her inspirational and vegan videos on Instagram, thanks to her cheerful personality and infectious smile. Now, she is entering a new phase in her life as an author. The 42-year-old released Feeding the Soul on Sept. 28 and recently shared an emotional video of herself after finding out her book was number one on the New York Times Best Sellers list.

Keep reading... Show less
Exclusive Interviews

Jill Scott Talks Balance, 'Highway To Heaven' & Not Burning Herself Out To Produce

In this exclusive, the actress dishes on executive producing the reboot, and balancing business and motherhood.

Latest Posts