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Angela Yee Shares How To Master The Art Of Side Hustling

Business

As women, we can do it all: make the babies, take care of the babies and our significant others, hold it down in the home and bring home the bacon, too. There is no underestimating a woman determined to thrive in today's society. Despite the persistent pay parity we see across all industries, we still manage to make it work. And while many of us are working longer hours for less pay, some of us have to rely on the side hustle in order to break free of this pay disparity.

Someone who is no stranger to the side hustle is The Breakfast Club's own Angela Yee.

When she's not being the female voice of reason between Charlamagne Tha God and DJ Envy over the airwaves, she's busy maximizing her talents in a number of side hustles that not only cater to her entrepreneurial spirit but also adds value to her community. Yee says that she learned the value of the side hustle early on after graduating from Wesleyan with a degree in English. She recently spoke Maiysha Kai of The Glow Up/The Root to discuss her approach to the side hustle game, as well as to deliver major keys that we can use in our pursuit of the profitable side gig.

"Side hustles have always been very important to me, because I have so many of them," the 42-year-old radio host says.

From working as an assistant with Wu-Tang Management and Eminem's Shady Limited clothing line, to eventually parlaying her experience to a marketing position with Sirius Satellite Radio, she was able to take her experiences and knowledge to a nationally syndicated radio show. However, Yee says that she needed side hustles for financial reasons. She says:

"I've had side hustles since the first job I ever had, because it was just a necessity for me, financially. It's one thing to complain about not having money, but you can't just complain; you have to do something about it. And if that means you have to go and get your side hustle on, then that's what you have to do."

If you've ever watched any of The Breakfast Club's interviews on YouTube, you might notice that there isn't a morning that Angela doesn't have a cup of "green juice" ready next to her laptop and microphone. That juice is a nod to one of her most recent side hustles turned legitimate business. Recently, she opened up her own franchise of Styles P's Juices for Life in Brooklyn stomping grounds.

Related: Angela Yee Got The Juice: An xoExclusive

The pressed-juice subscription service has garnered great reviews, and it's also a testament to going after your dreams and doing things independently, too. She tells The Glow Up:

"I think it is important for us, because sometimes, we put our dreams on hold and things that we really want to do, just because we feel like we have these other responsibilities that take precedence. But I think side hustles are really important for black women, in particular, because for so long, we haven't been getting equal pay, and we haven't been raised the way that we should—we haven't even been getting the starting salaries that we should. So I think it is important for us, just to make sure that we do these things independently, and make ourselves so great and so valuable that we can't be denied."

So if you are looking for a guide to start your own side hustle, Angela Yee gives us 7 tips to make sure that not only will you build a successful side hustle, but the hustle can be fun, fulfilling and profitable.

1.Find Your Passion

Yee says that she's always been able to find a side hustle that she is incredibly passionate about. When thinking of a side hustle, caring about what you're doing will make a noticeable difference in your drive and determination. We've all had jobs that we dread going to, so why not make your side hustle something that you would do for free, something that you already love? Yee suggests:

"Your side hustle should be something that you really care about and are passionate about—that's what I've always managed to do and find."

Featured Photo: Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock.com

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