Quantcast

Tika Sumpter Wants Women In Interracial Relationships To Know Their Partners Don't Need Protection

Plus, how three other celebrity interracial couples are tackling race, privilege, and social injustice.

Celebrity News

Love hit different when there's a global pandemic and full-blown international civil rights movement happening at the same damn time, and for couples in interracial relationships, the struggle to find peace can be especially real, but according to Tika Sumpter, it's imperative that women know that being their partners' protector is not their responsibility.

If you have ever suffered from the side effects of systemic racism, you know that white tears are real and the fact that they are coming from someone you love doesn't make them any less problematic. In a recent Tweet, Tika shared this sentiment and had a word for couples who are afraid to have hard conversations:

"Dear Black interracial couples with a significant other who is white (raises hand), we DO NOT need to protect them."

Tika suggested that if your partner has a problem talking about race, that clearly isn't your only problem:

"I promise, they will be A. OK. They need to continue to fight for us. If they get offended when you talk about racists. You have a bigger problem on your hands."

Tika is only one of the many celebrities who has been vocal about navigating interracial relationships in the midst of civil unrest.

Scroll below to see how more celebrities in interracial relationships are tackling conversations around race, privilege, and social injustice with their partners below:

Eve & Maximillion Cooper

"I am in an interracial relationship. I am having some of the most difficult and uncomfortable conversations I think I've ever had, and vice versa with my husband. But, at the same time, it's a beautiful thing, because ... I don't know his life through his eyes. He doesn't know my life through my eyes. All he can do is try to understand and try to ask the questions, and he wants to understand, and that's what the nation -- that's what the world -- has to do. It's gonna be uncomfortable. Yeah, it's going to be uncomfortable! But we have to be OK with being uncomfortable so that we can get to a solution."

Serena Williams & Alexis Ohanian 

Earlier this month, Reddit co-founder and executive chairman Alexis Ohanian announced his resignation and requested that a Black candidate serve as his replacement, a major decision that Alexis says he made for this woke AF reason:

"I didn't arrive at this easily. It was absolutely a hard decision. But thinking back, especially on the position our country's been in, and then especially in the last few weeks, I realized I needed to look at myself, look in the mirror and see what I could do to help contribute some real positive change, so that I could look my daughter in the eye when she's a little bit older and she asks me what I did to help make this country and this world a little bit better for her and for a whole lot of people who look like her."

Cameron & Lauren Speed-Hamilton

"We need to start asking ourselves, well, 'What can we proactively do to make that change happen?' I think one of the first things that we can do is accept that we have white privilege. I think it's something that people white people get defensive about. You know no one wants to feel like that didn't earn something but admitting that you have white privilege doesn't mean that you don't have challenges in your life it just means that your skin color is not a factor in determining what those challenges are so that's one thing."

Featured image by Instagram/@tikasumpter.

For the past 20 years, Target has introduced us to new and emerging designers from around the world, all at an incredible value. In the latest installment of their upcoming designer collection, this fall, Target features rising Haitian-American designer Victor Glemaud as one of four designer collections dropping today. Launching his eponymous leisurewear collection in 2006, the NYC-based designer expresses iconic and fun fashion through statement knitwear, designed for women of all races, sizes and personalities.

Keep reading... Show less
The daily empowerment fix you need.
Make things inbox official.

This is something that I've been wanting to write about for a while now. There are a few reasons why too. One is that I grew up hearing that happiness is an emotion — and a fleeting one at that; that's why the focus should actually be more on being in a state of joy. Secondly, I can't tell you how many times I have looked a husband or wife in the eye as they told me they were leaving their marriage — not because of infidelity or abuse; it was simply because "I'm not happy anymore" (more on that in a bit). And three, I also can't tell you how many times a day will go by without me hearing or reading some variation of "do whatever makes you happy". LAWD.

Keep reading... Show less

So, here's the deal about store-bought lubricant. Oftentimes, when people think about using it, it's in reference to "treating" vaginal dryness or making sex easier post-menopause (when our vagina walls tend to be thinner and our natural lubrication isn't as much as it once was). However, as you're about to see in just a few minutes, it really doesn't matter how wet you're naturally able to get or how old you are, everyone should have at least a few tubes of lube in their possession — an oil-based kind for non-penetrative sexual stimulation; a water-based one for sexy toys (or if you or your partner's genitalia is naturally sensitive) and a silicone-based one for intercourse.

Keep reading... Show less

Cuffing season just got a little bit hotter! This fall, Ready to Love is coming back to our screens for an all-new season, just in time for us to screen and cuddle up with potential baes in real life. For its fourth season, the hit show is trading in their popular Houston and Atlanta backdrops seen in previous seasons for the nation's capital: Washington, D.C. And as host Nephew Tommy Miles tells it, it's all about "location, location, location," baby!

Keep reading... Show less

We all know the feeling. You plop down in a stylist's seat excitedly waiting for your slay to begin, only to be met with a look of panic when they actually lay eyes on your hair. As a woman with thick and coarse 4C textured hair, I know that gaze well. Sadly, so do most Black women, and it's been an ongoing problem in the entertainment world for decades.

Keep reading... Show less
Exclusive Interviews

Exclusive: Lucky Daye Is Doing It For The Culture, From The Soul

Every so often, an artist comes along who seems to be a physical manifestation of all that we are.

Latest Posts