Quantcast

Did You Know Women (Can) Have Wet Dreams Too?

I just found another reason to want to get a little more sleep, sis.

Women's Health

I don't know about y'all, but when I was around the seventh grade and the subject of guys having wet dreams (with the technical term for it being "nocturnal emissions") came up in class, pretty much all I recall being told is it starts happening around puberty. Kind of like how a girl starts her period, once a young man hits a certain stage in his adolescence, it's not uncommon for him to wake up with sperm/semen on his sheets. Since he can't control it, you might want to steer clear of his bedding (you know, if the young man is related to you). That was basically it. Over and out. So, since I'm not a man, I didn't really give the topic too much more thought beyond that.

Matter of fact, if I'm going to be completely honest, up until a couple of weeks ago, I still never cared to do much more research on the matter. For better or for worse, I've never had an—eh hem—run in with wet-dreamed-sheets, so there was no real reason to ponder the issue. That is until, while I was doing some research on another matter entirely, I noticed a health-related article that spoke on the fact that women can have wet dreams too. Whaaa? Now, you've got my attention.

What You May or May Not Already Know About Wet Dreams

media.giphy.com

Just so you can process this without immediately thinking about your little brother or even your son, let me start by saying that there is another term that is used for wet dreams; one that I never even considered before. What is it? Sleep orgasms. Yep. When a guy has a wet dream, he's pretty much partaking in an orgasm that transpires in the midst of having a dream—oftentimes it's erotic but it doesn't always have to be—of some sort. The reason why it's associated so much with males and puberty is because that is typically around the time when young men begin to have sexually-related fantasies (when they're asleep and when they're awake); however, it definitely should go on record that grown men can experience wet dreams too.

As I did more research on all of this, I also learned that wet dreams do not reduce a guy's sperm count (although it can get some of his "older sperm" out of his system), it won't shrink his penis, and it does not negatively affect a person's immune system in any way. One more thing is that it's also quite common for women to have a few wet dreams of their own.

What Is a “Female Wet Dream” All About?

media.giphy.com

Again, if you look at all of this from the perspective of being a sleep orgasm, the fact that women are able to have a wet dream makes a lot of sense. Typically, they start to happen for us when we're around the age of 21. One study revealed that as much as 40 percent of women have reported having at least one wet dream by the time they reached their 40s. As far as what triggers them for us, a great sex dream oftentimes gets the credit, although some medical professionals say that we are perfectly capable of having one, even if we don't dream at all. How can you know if a wet dream/sleep orgasm has indeed happened to you? Word on the street is that an accelerated heartbeat, combined with more-than-usual vaginal lubrication are two pretty telling indicators. Oh, and if you're wondering if there is a certain "kind" of woman who is far more likely to have them, the answer is "yes". Another study revealed that women who naturally have an open mind and curiosity about sex are likely candidates to cum in their sleep.

I'm thinking that as you're taking all of this in, it's making more and more sense why both men and women can have wet dreams. But if you're like me and you're wondering what causes our bodies to react in this way when we're actually not (at least fully) conscious, I looked that up too.

When we reach a REM state of sleep, our breathing and heart rate naturally accelerates (which is why our body temperate tends to rise in the middle of the night too). When that happens, blow flow increases throughout our system, including to our genital region. Since we're not really able to control our inhibitions like we can whenever we are awake, it's much easier for us to get sexually excited and, as a result, have a full-on orgasm. This is especially the case if you're a woman who often sleeps on your stomach because that increases the chances of experiencing clitoral stimulation.

Now, with all of this on record, let me try and address a few other things that you might be asking yourself.

If you've never had a wet dream before, no, there is nothing wrong with you. Again, around 40 percent of women reported experiencing them. This means 60 percent have not (or at least, they haven't yet).

If you're curious about whether or not sex-related dreams will automatically result in a wet dream, the answer is no. There's no real scientific basis for this, other than, just like you might not always have an orgasm via "awakened sex", the same thing goes for how your mind and body respond/react when you're sleeping.

If you've wondered why you've awakened to feeling like you've had sex—whether you "feel that way" mentally or even physically—but, for some reason, you can't seem to cum when you're conscious, this isn't abnormal either. While there are dozens of reasons why it can be challenging for women to climax, a huge one is overthinking; something that doesn't typically happen when you're catchin' z-z-z's.

If you have wet dreams often and you're actually trying to figure out how to make them stop, good luck. While you can try a mental exercise like consciously thinking about any and everything other than sex before turning in, remember that, since you can have a wet dream, even without a sex dream, there's a good chance that you could have one, regardless of what your thought patterns are.

Oh, and if you've never had a wet dream before and you want to try and experience one, having sex, reading erotic or even sex journaling can get your mind in the mood to do some exploring while you rest.

Welp. There goes one of the things that tripped me out recently. So, the next time the topic of wet dreams comes up, just remember that it's not "boy's talk". Women have them too. They are natural. They are beneficial (just like any orgasm is). And, they are definitely a perk that comes with sleeping. Sweet dreams, sis.

Want more stories like this? Sign up for our newsletter here to receive our latest articles and news straight to your inbox.

Featured image by Giphy

Brooke Obie is xoNecole’s new editor-in-chief, and this sister has the career receipts that prove that she’s set to take the platform to the next level. Let’s start with the proof of real skin in the media game: She is an award-winning journalist, whose work has been featured in The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Essence, Marie Claire, Teen Vogue, and many more.

Keep reading... Show less
The daily empowerment fix you need.
Make things inbox official.

Over the weekend, xoNecole held a Twitter Spaces conversation with the cast of Harlem which included the show’s stars Meagan Good, Grace Byers, and Shoniqua Shandai. Host Gia Peppers facilitated the conversation as the ladies dished on topics such as goal-setting, love, and of course unforgettable moments from the hit Amazon Prime show.

Keep reading... Show less

I’m pretty sure that we’ve all heard the saying, “opinions are like buttholes” (yeah, I cleaned that up a bit) and everyone has one. Well, when it comes to the topic of advice, if we’re gonna be real about it, a lot of times all it is, is an opinion too. So, does this mean that we’re never supposed to ask for advice or take any when it’s offered? I mean, I get that since I’m a marriage life coach, it comes off as completely on-brand that I would say that receiving advice can actually be quite beneficial.

Keep reading... Show less

Vivica A. Fox kicked off the new year just right with a solo vacation. The veteran actress visited The Real to dish on her booked and busy career, but during the conversation, she also revealed that she “took a 10-day vacation all by myself.” After spending Thanksgiving with her family in Indianapolis and Christmas with her godchildren, the Two Can Play That Game star jetted off to somewhere tropical for some me-time.

Keep reading... Show less

On a Tuesday evening, I am waiting for an interview that I know will be full of gems and will surely change a Black woman’s life. But I’m also full of nerves and anxiety. Friends and family members all around are testing positive and it's like Omarion took his hit song, "Touch" to a new level. My anxiety is on 1,000. Then, E! News host Francesca Amiker joins the Zoom call. Full of joy and light, I can’t lie, she brightened my day as soon as she turned on her camera, flashed that bright smile, and greeted me the only way a Southern belle would.

Keep reading... Show less
Exclusive Interviews

Boris Kodjoe And Nicole Ari Parker Know “When To Bring Work Home” For Their New Film 'Safe Room'

The husband-and-wife dream team have found their sweet spot.

Latest Posts