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This Dope Female Barber Is Breaking Stereotypes As A True Mother/Hustler

The key is to feel the fear and do it anyway.

Mother/Hustler

So many of the moments in our life feel motivated by fear, but the key is to feel it and do it anyway.

When Jaelyn Langston left her job as a grade-school teacher, she had no idea that she would become one of the most well-known and most sought out female barbers in New Orleans, but she did it anyway. The 35-year-old barber shared that while she enjoyed teaching, the vulgar vernacular on her social media pages quickly became a topic of conversation in the teacher's lounge and she made a decision to choose a career that allowed her the freedom of expression.

While pursuing a new career as an adult was scary for the mother-of-one, issa fact that doubt kills more dreams than failure ever could. She told xoNecole, "When the universe taps you on your shoulder, answer. We all know when it's time to move on but we get stalled by fear and uncertainty. Test the water! We'll be surprised to learn there's nothing this universe wouldn't award us."

Now, instead of lining kids up for snack time, Jae spends her time hooking New Orleans men up with a snack-worthy line-up. Although Jae enjoyed the stability of her 9 to 5, this Mother/Hustler says that her sanity was more valuable. Jae told xoNecole, "I often think about the consistent pay and schedule and how life seemed a tad bit more simple, but it also felt out of alignment with who I am; I couldn't imagine clocking hours for someone else's dream."

Along with being a full-time barber, multimedia personality, and positive vibe-pusher, Jae puts most of her energy into raising her 10-year-old king. According to Jae, because her time is so limited, she makes sure to use it valuably, "Time is one of the most important assets, if not the most important. Build rituals and routines that keep you motivated and grounded. Revisit and adjust regularly."

We sat down and talked to Jae about how she manages being a full-time mom and 24/7 hustler all while minding her self-care at the same damn time. Here's what she had to say:

How do you handle moments when you feel overwhelmed? 

"In moments where I feel overwhelmed, I carve out a space to gather myself. I stop to breathe and sort through my feelings and get to the bottom of why I'm feeling overwhelmed. Then, I fix what I can and release what I can't."

"I carve out a space to gather myself. I stop to breathe and sort through my feelings and get to the bottom of why I'm feeling overwhelmed. Then, I fix what I can and release what I can't."

What’s the hardest part of your day?

"I honestly don't know what the 'hardest' part of my day is. That's just not how my mind works now. There are things that need to be done … I do them and move on the next thing to do. Sometimes I have to move on from a project to avoid frustration and getting stuck, but I wouldn't call that hard. I'd call that maneuvering."

How (and how often) do you practice self-care?

"It's mandatory that I practice self-care daily. Usually, it's in the form of my morning ritual: morning joint, meditation, stretch, and workout. I also have random moments of nude dancing where I embrace my body and spirit or grounding under a favorite tree."

When do you feel most productive? 

"I feel most productive when I've completed a task outside of my comfort zone. I'm not much on networking or cutting deals with strangers or distant associates, so when I'm able to check off an objective that falls under that umbrella, I feel extra good."

What is your advice for dealing with mom guilt?

"The best advice I could give for mom guilt would be don't beat yourself up for the sacrifices you have to make today. The tomorrows will be so much better because of them. Communicate your feelings with your children. They can understand and respect what we're going through if given an opportunity to do so. My son is very perceptive… and feels me. It takes more energy trying to keep things from him, so I've found it's easier and more beneficial to just let him know how I feel about my 'current mom status.'"

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned as an entrepreneur? 

"[Practice] consistent effort with your goal in mind and be prepared to do it ALL even if you don't have to. Everything will not always be aligned and you'll HAVE to jump in to get things done to keep moving."

What is the most important lesson you want your kid(s) to learn from you? 

"The most important lesson my son can learn from me is, happiness is possible and plentiful. Explore this world and continuously find new ways to love yourself. Self-care is necessary and may often be confused for being selfish by those who aren't willing to understand. Those who do care to understand will encourage all works that lead to your happiness."

"The most important lesson my son can learn from me is, happiness is possible and plentiful. Explore this world and continuously find new ways to love yourself."

How has being a mother helped you become a better entrepreneur (or vice versa)? 

"Being a mother puts the fire under you to succeed. Your biggest fan is watching front row and center at all times. I have no choice but to be honest about my efforts and success. It's easy to bullshit yourself but it's a little tougher to when your wide-eyed, inquisitive child is watching."

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced as a mom who runs a business?

"The biggest challenge being a mom and entrepreneur is figuring out a way to keep the money flowing when you have to drop everything and be a mom. I have no 'sick days' or 'vacation time'. I have to be prepared to make money even when physically can't make money."

Do you think it’s important to keep your personal and professional life separate? Why or why not? 

"The need or desire to keep one's personal and professional life separate would be based on the individual. My brand was birthed out of my transparency, so there is a very blurred line with my personal and professional life. Of course there are things that remain private, but for the most part, expressing the ins and outs of my journey have only contributed to the success of my business endeavors. I would say to anyone be true to who you are. People gravitate toward authenticity. If you're forcing it, your audience/market will know."

"Expressing the ins and outs of my journey have only contributed to the success of my business endeavors. I would say to anyone be true to who you are.

What tips do you have for financial planning, both professionally and for your family?

"Budget. Determine what percentages make sense and stick to those numbers. We can't and don't skim off the top with the light bill or car insurance; don't do it with your own goals. Handle your budgets the way you handle your bills… put the money where it NEEDS to be. Build both a personal and professional 'Just in Case' account. Having a cushion is always good."

Keep up with Jae by following her on Instagram @Jae_Every_Dae.

Featured image by @coseyphoto.

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