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She Get It From Her Mama: Megan Thee Stallion Is Following In Her Mother's Rap Career Footsteps

At 7 years old, the superstar knew she wanted to be a rapper.

Celebrity News

Megan Thee Stallion is such a breath of fresh air. To me, she represents women that are unapologetic about doing what's best for themselves. In a world where women, *cough* Black women *cough* are so policed--from hair, to behavior, to reactions--she shows up as a superhero, inspiring and representing a young generation of women who are authentically themselves. And not only that, they're women who don't stray from getting what they deserve.


Additionally, the "Savage" rapper, is multi-dimensional, encouraging a lifestyle that balances fitness, education, and doing hot girl shit.

Oh, and being the first rapper on the cover of 'Sports Illustrated SI'.

But guess what, sis got it all from her mama!

Her mom Holly Thomas, who was a rapper back in the day and who went by the name "Holly-Wood," died in March 2019 after being diagnosed with a brain tumor. But while young, Meg learned early on that she wanted to be a rapper too. She would attend her mother's recording studio sessions, which ultimately solidified that she wanted to be a star while hoping her mom never found out until she was 18. In her latest interview conducted by Tyra Banks for Sports Illustrated, she said:
"I wanted to be perfect to her. I was practicing since I was, like, 7. And then when I got in high school, I was like, 'No, I'm not gonna tell her yet.' But she would have these CDs laying around the house -- like, instrumentals -- and I would take 'em in my room, and I would take the beats and write to 'em in my room. And she would say, 'Megan, have you seen my CDs?' And I was like, 'No. What are you talking about?'"

But when she got to college, she began to pursue music seriously, which she knew she had to come clean about to her mom.

"So I finally came to her. I might have been 20, and I was like, 'I can rap.' And she was like, 'No, you can't.' And I was like, 'Yes, I can.' And she was like, 'Let me hear it. And I was like, 'OK Mama, don't whoop me, but I'm 'bout to curse, OK?' So I started going off and I'm cursing and she's like [gasps], 'Where did you learn all those words?!' .... And she said, 'You're not coming out until you're 21.'"

As soon as 21 hit, Meg released her debut single "Like a Stallion" and went on to release a numerous of SoundCloud mixtapes. In 2018, she signed to the Houston-based label 1501 Entertainment, released her Tina Snow EP, and broke out as a true powerhouse.

And three Grammy wins later, the rest is hot girl shit, history

Meg has spoken about her mother numerous times in the past, once telling Marie Claire that she credits her mother for introducing her to hip-hop. In fact, Meg would witness her mother, who was a bill collector, work on her career around her 9-5 schedule.

"I would see her fit in writing after work and before work. I'm used to seeing that work ethic."

Holly was a part of the Screwed Up Click, a big collective in Houston, and she released music from 2001-2007. One of her biggest hits was a single dedicated to DJ Screw, the leader of the Screwed Up Click, and if you know the history of Houston music, that's huge! Unfortunately, two weeks after the passing of Meg's grandmother in 2019, her mom passed as well, which Meg never publicly took the time to mourn about. She was back on tour a day after the funeral.

She told FADER:

"No matter what I'm going through, I still want to keep going. Just to show people you can still be strong and you can still face your everyday life. Even when everything coming down on you. I didn't cancel none of my shows 'cause I just knew — I know — how my momma is, and I know she wouldn't want me to stop."

She get it from her mama.

Watch the hot tub interview with Tyra below:

Featured image by Rich Fury/Getty Images for Visible

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