Quantcast
Shutterstock

10 Careers In Wellness That Bring In Big Bank

Try tapping into this multibillion-dollar industry with these top picks.

Wellness

With all that's going on with COVID-19, many have decided to begin paying closer attention to their health and wellness. And sis, the wellness industry is now worth an estimated $40 billion, making it one lucrative industry to get into. With trends like at-home fitness, digital detoxing, and cannabis infusion, there's an open avenue to break into or level up for finding the best careers in health and wellness.


Here are 10 opportunities that are not only growing in demand but are bringing in a nice chunk of change:

1.Registered Nutritional Therapist

Shutterstock

The median income for a Registered Nutritional Therapist is a little more than $60,000 annually, and it's definitely a career that is in common demand. Becoming registered gives you a bit more credibility, and many schools offer programs to get the credentials you'll need. Nutritional therapists typically have their own practices and offer luxury or alternative health plans to ensure their clients health and wellness goals are met. Some also work for clinics and organizations to serve their patients' needs.

2.Wellness Literary Agent

You can make an average of $59,000 as a wellness literary agent, and if you're up on wellness industry trends and news and have experience in publishing, PR, or sales, it's a gig you might be great at. You'll have to get your clients' books in front of publishers and sometimes you'll even be part of the edit and update process of a work. You'll also be handling contracts and making sure your clients get the best deal. And don't sleep on the book industry: More than 60 billion units of actual print books are still being consumed by Americans and the audiobook industry continues to show strides at more than $1 billion in revenue last year.

3.Nutrition Influencer and Blogger

Shutterstock

If you're passionate about all things nutrition and are a great writer, this is a great fit. The starting annual salary for a nutrition influencer and blogger is a little above $33,000 but can grow to more than $80,000, especially if you write for your own website and create your own brand. You can take it to the next level and either run a YouTube channel or blog for a major food, wellness, or healthcare brand (which can bring in an average of $50,000 per year) or start one of your own and join the ranks of influencers making six figures or more.

4.Corporate Wellness Administrator

You can make a median income of $63,000 per year doing a job that involves managing the administration of wellness benefits for employees of a company or corporation. You'll need a bachelor's degree for this job and a few years of experience, and if you have a passion for finding the best options for others to ensure their ultimate wellness, the role of a Corporate Wellness Administrator is worth a try.

5.Virtual Fitness Trainer

Shutterstock

Though some gyms have reopened, many are still taking hits due to many fitness buffs and budding health enthusiasts doing more of their workouts at home. Health and fitness equipment sales more than doubled between March and October of last year, according to research, and trainers have began going virtual, offering classes, one-one-one training and boot camps that people can do from the comfort of their own homes. The virtual fitness market is set to hit more than $59 billion by 2027, and if you can cater to a niche and get certified, you could potentially become a self-employed, very wealthy phenom. If entrepreneurship is not your thing, you can still work as a trainer for a major gym or other organization making a starting average of at least $46,000 a year, a number that goes up substantially based on your experience, certifications, and caliber of client.

6.Wellness App Creator

Wellness apps are reportedly booming and set to bring in more than $14 billion in revenue within the next seven years. If you have great ideas, are in the tech industry already, or simply have an eye for app savvy, get on the train, sis! Creating an app is not as hard as one might think, but it does require quite a bit of planning, research and marketing in order to get it off the ground. You can also work for a tech company and make an average of $64,000 to $96,000 developing mobile apps. Having a bachelor's in computer science, programming, or software engineering is great (especially if you're into the traditional job of working for another company), but a few app creators simply took courses, hired outside vendors to build it, or worked with partners to bring their wellness apps to life.

7.Massage Therapist

Shutterstock

Jobs as a massage therapist are set to grow by 21 percent into 2029, and the median salary is almost $43,000 per year. Depending on your location, you'll need certain certifications and hours of experience in order to legally practice as a massage therapist, and you can even build your own practice of clients. Even in pandemic times, massage therapists are finding unique ways to offer services like expert virtual stretch sessions, massage instruction for people with special needs, and one-on-one personal sessions within sanitized environments like clients' homes or doctor's offices.

8.Virtual Therapist

You can choose to get licensed (as a licensed practical counselor or LPC) or become a non-licensed practitioner (who has a master's degree and can offer lay counseling for life coaching and services of that nature) who helps people in the area of mental wellness. Some licensed counselors work for schools, nonprofits or corporations, while some have their own practices with specialties in EMDR methods or psychotherapy. Some non-licensed counselors lead church ministries, counsel women in nonprofit programs or have their own coaching programs. Online therapy services are charging upwards of $100 per hour, and the average salary for a therapist stands at $69,000 for those with licensure and $64,000 for unlicensed counselors.

9.Personal Wellness Chef

Shutterstock

Starting at an average of more than $44,000 per year (with an increase potential of up to $62,000), this job is a great one if you're well-informed (in some cases, certified) in nutrition or a niche like vegan, raw, cannabis-infused, or gluten-free dishes. Some chefs focus in on certain client goals (ie.. weight loss, weight gain, muscle building, diabetes maintenance, or hypertension control) while others specialize in creating plans for people with allergies or other disorders. You can start your own mobile or personal chef business or work for restaurants and even food brands, creating menus or tailored dishes for mass production.

10. Longevity Wellness Specialist

This gig allows you to focus in on creating plans for people to not only live long lives, but the best version of that. You'll teach clients or groups how to sustain a healthy lifestyle, what supplements and other resources they should tap into to boost quality of life and incorporate management of sustainability of wellness. The average salary is $44,000 per year but salary potential can increase to up to $90,000.

Are you a member of our insiders squad? Join us in the xoTribe Members Community today!

Featured image by Shutterstock

The emergence of a week-long tension headache told me that I needed to figure out a way to minimize and relieve my stress. In addition to daily magnesium supplements and meditation, I also found myself wanting to orgasm (the health benefits are hard to ignore) and do so at least every other day.

I was determined to set the mood and engage in some erotic self-focus by way of masturbation, and I wanted to do so with a little more variety than my wand vibrator provides. My commitment to almost daily masturbation was affirmed even further with the arrival of what would become my new favorite sex toy, the viral Lovers’ Thump & Thrust Dual Vibrator.

Keep reading...Show less
The daily empowerment fix you need.
Make things inbox official.

If there is one artist who has had a very successful and eventful year so far it’s Mary J. Blige. The “Queen of Hip-Hop Soul” shut down the 2022 Super Bowl Half-time show along with Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, 50 Cent, and Eminem, she also performed at NBA All-Star weekend and now she is being honored as one of Time's most influential people of 2022.

Keep reading...Show less

These days it seems that we’re all trying to heal from childhood wounds, and though I’m a big advocate for cutting people off – family included – I’ve come to learn how challenging that actually is. But also, it’s not always necessary if you have a parent who is open and committed to doing the healing work along with you, a mother, for example, who is receptive to her truth. But this also means you are receptive to the reality that parents are humans who often take cake crumbs from their parents and so on. It’s not to say that you have to accept piss-poor treatment because they’re human, but if any of us are going to embark upon a healing journey, we must acknowledge even the difficult truths.

Keep reading...Show less

Queen Latifah is saying no to unhealthy and dangerous lifestyles especially when it comes to her career. Since the beginning, the rapper/actress has always been a body-positive role model thanks to the range of characters she has played over the years that shows that size doesn’t matter. In an interview with PEOPLE, The Equalizer star opened up about taking on roles that don't compromise her health.

Keep reading...Show less

When I was ten, my Sunday school teacher put on a brief performance in class that included some of the boys standing in front of the classroom while she stood in front of them holding a heart shaped box of chocolate. One by one, she tells each boy to come and bite a piece of candy and then place the remainder back into the box. After the last boy, she gave the box of now mangled chocolate over to the other Sunday school teacher — who happened to be her real husband — who made a comically puzzled face. She told us that the lesson to be gleaned from this was that if you give your heart away to too many people, once you find “the one,” that your heart would be too damaged. The lesson wasn’t explicitly about sex but the implication was clearly present.

That memory came back to me after a flier went viral last week, advertising an abstinence event titled The Close Your Legs Tour with the specific target demo of teen girls came across my Twitter timeline. The event was met with derision online. Writer, artist, and professor Ashon Crawley said: “We have to refuse shame. it is not yours to hold. legs open or not.” Writer and theologian Candice Marie Benbow said on her Twitter: “Any event where 12-17-year-old girls are being told to ‘keep their legs closed’ is a space where purity culture is being reinforced.”

“Purity culture,” as Benbow referenced, is a culture that teaches primarily girls and women that their value is to be found in their ability to stay chaste and “pure”–as in, non-sexual–for both God and their future husbands.

I grew up in an explicitly evangelical house and church, where I was taught virginity was the best gift a girl can hold on to until she got married. I fortunately never wore a purity ring or had a ceremony where I promised my father I wouldn’t have pre-marital sex. I certainly never even thought of having my hymen examined and the certificate handed over to my father on my wedding day as “proof” that I kept my promise. But the culture was always present. A few years after that chocolate-flavored indoctrination, I was introduced to the fabled car anecdote. “Boys don’t like girls who have been test-driven,” as it goes.

And I believed it for a long time. That to be loved and to be desired by men, it was only right for me to deny myself my own basic human desires, in the hopes of one day meeting a man that would fill all of my fantasies — romantically and sexually. Even if it meant denying my queerness, or even if it meant ignoring how being the only Black and fat girl in a predominantly white Christian space often had me watch all the white girls have their first boyfriends while I didn’t. Something they don’t tell you about purity culture – and that it took me years to learn and unlearn myself – is that there are bodies that are deemed inherently sinful and vulgar. That purity is about the desire to see girls and women shrink themselves, make themselves meek for men.

Purity culture isn’t unlike rape culture which tells young girls in so many ways that their worth can only be found through their bodies. Whether it be through promiscuity or chastity, young girls are instructed on what to do with their bodies before they’ve had time to figure themselves out, separate from a patriarchal lens. That their needs are secondary to that of the men and boys in their lives.

It took me a while —after leaving the church and unlearning the toxic ideals around purity culture rooted in anti-Blackness, fatphobia, heteropatriarchy, and queerphobia — to embrace my body, my sexuality, and my queerness as something that was not only not sinful or dirty, but actually in line with the vision God has over my life. Our bodies don't stop being our temples depending on who we do or who we don’t let in, and our worth isn’t dependent on the width of our legs at any given point.

Let’s make things inbox official! Sign up for the xoNecole newsletter for daily love, wellness, career, and exclusive content delivered straight to your inbox.

Featured image by Getty Images

Exclusive Interviews
Latest Posts