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This Educator Shares Her Cannabis-Infused Beauty Routine

About Face

In About Face, xoNecole gets the 411 on IGers who give us #skincaregoals on the daily. Here they break down their beauty routines on the inside and out, as well as the highly coveted products that grace their shelves and their skin.


To keep it all the way 100 with you, I didn't come across DeJanae Evins in some roundabout way on the Explore page on my IG feed. Instead, she found me. She first graced our site as a contributor, penning articles about wellness, veganism, and weed when it called for it. In addition to dabbling in entrepreneurship and freelancing, DeJanae is also a certified cannabis educator at the helm of the platform Green Goddess Glow.

As someone who is knowledgeable the healing powers of cannabis and encourages others to indulge in "mindful cannabis and self-care practices," DeJanae finds herself very fulfilled by the work she does. "My favorite part about the work I do is encouraging culture-shifting conversations around the ways we define health and wellness, usually in ways that emphasize ancestral knowledge," she shared with xoNecole.

After giving her a follow on Instagram, it was easy to become enamored by her physical beauty as well. The 27-year-old LA-based entrepreneur in all her cocoa skin and cocoa butter kissed glory has skin that could be the envy of all the girls in the yard. Which is absolutely why I had to hit her up to learn more about the routines that helped her maintain and own her beauty from the outside in.

And here's what she had to say.

My morning routine looks like...

"A typical morning for me begins with warm water and lemon. Expressing gratitude, prayer and intention setting."

For my skincare routine in the AM...

"My morning skincare routine looks like a quick rinse using Dr. Bronner's Hemp Soap(Amazon, $12), followed by Dame Body's Manuka Honey Face Scrub. I try to use cannabis in my skincare regimen because its benefits are so far reaching! It's a great inflammatory and moisturizes without clogging the pores. Then I'll tone with Thayers Alcohol-Free Rose Petal Witch Hazel (Amazon, $9) or Dame Body's Witch Hazel Orange Blossom Toner. A lot of the time I'm using Dame Body's Orange Blossom Toner because, in addition to witch hazel distillate, there are citrus botanical extracts, including neroli essential oil, which comes from the bitter orange tree. It's a sweet fragrance and is rich in vitamins A, C and E.

"And I finish with a Dame Body's Raw Face Serum, which is full of African wild harvested and cold pressed oils like Tanzanian Tamanu, Sea Buckthorn Oil, Rwandan Maracuja oil and Namibian Marula oil. It also includes Raspberry and Egyptian Carrot oils that naturally provide an SPF 30, protecting against UVA and UVB rays, which is great because my skin usually breaks out from the chemicals in traditional sunscreens. Throughout the day, I'm refreshing with rose water or Dame Body's Orange Blossom Water imported from Lebanon and infused with Citrine crystals."

And for my skincare routine in the PM...

"At night, I melt off all my make up with Caudalie Cleansing Oil (Macys, $28) and OSEA Ocean Cleanser (Neiman Marcus, $48) before getting in the shower. I try to stay away from using product with animal bones or gelatin. And I love that OSEA has algae, or seaweed, in it which is a great alternative. I follow this up a Manuka Honey Face Scrub (Amazon, $13) that I put on while I wash my body and brush my teeth (because a girl loves to multi-task!). Then I rinse the scrub off, apply Dame Body's Witch Hazel Orange Blossom Toner and finish with the Raw Face Serum."

How the seasons affect my approach to skincare...

"I'd say my winter/fall products are more heavy, I do a lot more moisturizing in the colder months to avoid peeling and dry skin. I consult with skin care specialists like Sannae of Dame Body who keep me informed about the best methods to maintain clear and healthy skin in seasonal transitions."

My go-to makeup look consists of...

"My look is pretty consistent, unless it's a special occasion. In addition to the Raw Face Serum, I use The Body Shop's Hemp Heavy Duty Face Protector (Amazon, $13) when I'm not wearing makeup and Hangover Replenishing Face Primer which doubles as a moisturizer when I am applying makeup. My go-to foundation is Becca because I get so many compliments on my skin when I wear it. I use Sephora concealer, Laura Mercier finishing powder, a $7 Black Radiance True Complexion Contour Palette, and NYX's Dubai liquid matte lipstick. That's pretty much my day-to-day look."

How I approach beauty from the inside-out...

"The things I do that me that make me feel on the inside as good as you look on the outside are keeping a lot of living things around: plants and flowers. I try to make a habit of buying myself flowers weekly. I burn sweet smelling incense, usually jasmine or sandalwood. I sunbathe. I put my phone on Do No Disturb without apologizing for it later. I smoke weed often and take functional mushrooms like Lion's Mane daily. I also grow my own cannabis in my backyard. It's how I stay grounded and in tune with nature."

What self-care looks like to me...

"A few of my self-care must-haves include: alkaline water, daily sun exposure, a jade roller, [and] my Lioness vibrator. When I have the time to, and I'm not rushing to bed to get a decent amount of sleep, I unwind with a bath, I journal, I meditate and steep mugwort tea with a heaping helping of honey."

For more of DeJanae, follow her on Instagram.

Black Women, We Deserve More

When the NYT posted an article this week about the recent marriage of a Black woman VP of a multi-billion-dollar company and a Black man who took her on a first date at the parking lot of a Popeyes, the reaction on social media was swift and polarizing. The two met on Hinge and had their parking lot rendezvous after he’d canceled their first two dates. When the groom posted a photo from their wedding on social media, he bragged about how he never had “pressure” to take her on “any fancy dates or expensive restaurants.”

It’s worth reading on your own to get the full breadth of all the foolery that transpired. But the Twitter discourse it inspired on what could lead a successful Black woman to accept lower than bare minimum in pursuit of a relationship and marriage, made me think of the years of messaging that Black women receive about how our standards are too high and what we have to “bring to the table” in order to be "worthy" of what society has deemed is the ultimate showing of our worth: a marriage to a man.

That's right, the first pandemic I lived through was not Covid, but the pandemic of the Black male relationship expert. I was young – thirteen to be exact – when Steve Harvey published his best-selling book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man. Though he was still just a stand-up comedian, oversized suit hoarder, and man on his third marriage at the time, his relationship advice was taken as the gospel truth.

The 2000s were a particularly bleak time to be a single Black woman. Much of the messaging –created by men – that surrounded Black women at the time blamed their desire for a successful career and for a partner that matched their drive and ambition for the lack of romance in their life. Statistics about Black women’s marriageability were always wielded against Black women as evidence of our lack of desirability.

It’s no wonder then that a man that donned a box cut well into the 2000s was able to convince women across the nation to not have sex for the first three months of a relationship. Or that a slew of other Black men had their go at telling Black women that they’re not good enough and why their book, seminar, or show will be the thing that makes them worthy of a Good Man™.

This is how we end up marrying men who cancel twice before taking us on a “date” in the Popeyes parking lot, or husbands writing social media posts about how their Black wife is not “the most beautiful” or “the most intelligent” or the latest season of trauma dumping known as Black Love on OWN.

Now that I’ve reached my late twenties, many things about how Black women approach dating and relationships have changed and many things have remained the same. For many Black women, the idea of chronic singleness is not the threat that it used to be. Wanting romance doesn’t exist in a way that threatens to undermine the other relationships we have with our friends, family, and ourselves as it once did, or at least once was presented to us. There is a version of life many of us are embracing where a man not wanting us, is not the end of what could still be fruitful and vibrant life.

There are still Black women out there however who have yet to unlearn the toxic ideals that have been projected onto us about our worthiness in relation to our intimate lives. I see it all the time online. The absolute humiliation and disrespect some Black women are willing to stomach in the name of being partnered. The hoops that some Black women are willing to jump through just to receive whatever lies beneath the bare minimum.

It's worth remembering that there are different forces at play that gather to make Black women feast off the scraps we are given. A world saturated by colorism, fatphobia, anti-Blackness, ableism, and classism will always punish Black women who demand more for themselves. Dismantling these systems also means divesting from any and everything that makes us question our worth.

Because truth be told, Black women are more than worthy of having a love that is built on mutual respect and admiration. A love that is honey sweet and radiates a light that rivals the sun. A love that is a steadying calming force that doesn’t bring confusion or anxiety. Black women deserve a love that is worthy of the prize that we are.

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Featured image: Getty Images

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