Quantcast

8 Women Share How They Own Their Buzz Cuts

"A woman who cuts her hair is about to change her life."

Human Interest

Coco Chanel said, "A woman who cuts her hair is about to change her life." Muva was speaking the truth because a hair cut provides liberation and freedom for so many women.

It is especially hard for women of color to choose to embrace that freedom because our culture romanticizes long, thick hair. The moment you tell your mom, aunt, or play cousin that you plan to cut your hair, they will act as if someone died. For decades, it has been instilled in us that our hair represents our crowns. This means cutting your hair signifies being stripped of your glory.

Well, that is over and done because it's a new year, and we have the right to decide what our crowns bespeak. From rocking 4C kinky hair to donning a buzz cut, the choice is yours.

Rocking a buzz cut has to be the one of the boldest moves a woman of color can make. Thankfully, there are some daring and beautiful women living life unapologetically and wearing their buzz cuts with confidence and ease – these are their stories.

Jacinda

@Adultsdrink

I decided to cut my hair the summer of 2017 because my hair was severely damaged, and I was really growing tired of my ordinary look. I also wanted to challenge myself and detach myself from my hair, since my hair was part of my identity then. As soon as I shaved my hair off, I immediately fell in love with my buzz cut and felt like a redefined individual. I felt free to be quite honest. I was breaking gender norms and embracing my baldness.

My shaved head reminds me that beauty is within and doesn't equate to how long your hair is.

Hair is just an accessory some people choose to rock more than others. Hair isn't a necessity for me; it's more like costume jewelry. Regardless of how people choose to rock their hair, buzz cuts should not be associated with just men. Buzz cuts are unisex hairstyles.

Lolayé Dubiose

@lolaye_d

My first chop was in July 2012 and I haven't looked back since. I had a decent length of hair growing up and I was always told, "You won't be cute without hair," or "Your hair is what makes you." I never understood how having hair could define a person and I was sick of hearing it, so I headed to my nearest barbershop and told him to go for it.

One of the best decisions I've ever made.

I just recently tried to dye my hair gray after being blonde for months, and it magically turned pink… I have no idea or scientific explanation for it (laughs). But I decided to embrace change and OWN my pretty pink buzz cut by rocking it effortlessly!

Tumelo Moliko

@tumi_moliko

Living in South Africa as a young black woman, I've had to find creative ways of redefining the buzz cut in a way that showcases my personality best.

I color my hair, shave letters into my hair, maybe even add glitter if I'm in the mood; or sometimes I just wake up and leave my hair to do what it does best, shrink into beautiful little coils on the top of my head. I used to find myself grabbing any accessory and makeup product to put on, just to make up for the absence of hair on my head, however, I have now come to learn the true essence of owning my buzz cut.

Firstly, I had to fall in love with my revamped self and then, I had to confidently allow the world to see my cranium in its true element. From there, owning my buzz cut has become so effortless, yet so impactful on my being.

I've realized that being in high school and cutting your hair off completely is a BRAVE MOVE because judgment is inevitable. Being able to conquer my fear of judgment really did empower me in so many aspects of life. I shaved my hair off at 16 because I no longer wanted my hair to be perceived as an extension of my personality. I was known as the girl with the bob cut, and constantly complimented on my hair.

I no longer wanted my hair to own me.

Hair is praised in society and steers discrimination in many South African schools today. On the other end of things, a woman that does not have hair (whether it be by choice or not) is judged frequently by so many people in society because it goes against the norm.

In grade 10, I started feeling as though my identity no longer belonged to me. I felt as though my identity was now made up of physical things, including the strands growing out of my scalp. That's when I decided to be brave and stood in front of the mirror, picked up the clippers, and shaved all my hair off. I have felt empowered, liberated, and truly myself ever since. Owning my buzz cut meant repossessing my true self. I wouldn't change the experience for the world.

Shay

@ShayGlam00

I chose to cut my hair as a form of expression and to make me feel more confident.

Art is an outlet for me. Cutting my hair happens to be the best form of expression for me now. Before I decided to cut my hair, I was feeling uninspired. I was stressed out, I wasn't focused, and I was kinda depressed. It felt like nothing was going right, I didn't know what I wanted to do. I felt like I was wasting my talents, I felt like I wasn't good at it, I was losing myself and didn't care about things I loved. I had to get rid of that doubt and get out of that mindset. I've been through some tough times in my life and one thing that was always with me was my hair. My hair was there when I was sad, inspired, stressed, happy, motivated, and depressed.

Art had always been a way to express myself. I've always been daring with hair colors and other forms of creating but this time, I wanted to cut it all off. So the night before I got it cut while I was sleeping, I sorted through all of my feelings and any doubts and any reminders that stopped me from wanting to be great. When I woke up that morning, I was determined to feel better, do better, and live better. With every shave, I was close to feeling like a new person.

So now every time I cut my hair I'm freeing my body, my mind, and spirit of any negative vibes and starting over. To top it off, I'll dye my hair a new color.

Cutting my hair gave me a sense of power and confidence.

You have to be a strong and daring woman to rock a buzz cut. I own my cut by living in my confidence. Now my room isn't the only place I feel confident, I'm confident everywhere I go! I smile back at people that smile and stare at me instead of looking at my phone or walking in another direction. Honey, I own every room I walk in now.

Morgan Bryant

I originally chose to cut all my hair off in 2009 to release myself from all the "good hair, bad hair" ideals I grew up with.

I know I'm not the only black girl who grew up telling people, "I have Indian in my family" just to give the impression that my hair would somehow be better because I was "mixed."

I have cut my hair and let it grow out many times since then, but this is the first time I have truly loved being bald! I enjoy the attention I get when I walk into a space and people are taken aback that my confidence is just as strong without hiding behind a bunch of hair. I serve face! I even started an Instagram page @baldgirlmagic and hashtag #BaldGirlMagic to celebrate beautiful bald women like myself. Whether you lost your hair from chemo or you chose to shave it, we all belong to this really cool club!

Sienna Brown

@jewsie

I own my buzz cut by simply being myself.

Six years ago, when I first cut my hair, I was uncertain about how I would be viewed. Not having hair has really allowed me to discover the best parts of myself and provide me with the confidence needed to go through life full-speed.

I am proud of the woman I am and the woman I'm becoming. I truly don't see me ever growing it out!

Khendra Harris

@bigbuttbaldy

It's been almost 8 years now since I've cut my hair, and my reason for cutting it at 20 turning 21 was because weaves were expensive (laughs). I'd just wanted to try something new, finally getting to the legal drinking age.

I wasn't really thinking of the freedom that I was about to feel.

My reason for keeping it cut became so much more than just saving money. I'd felt so liberated, so open! I had nothing to hide behind.

I've owned having my short cut by being unapologetically me, no matter where I go.

By not being shy when walking into a barbershop filled with men, and by not being afraid to show the women in my family that there are many different standards of beauty.

Destiny Owusu

@ohwawa_

I own my buzz cut in the most beautiful way.

I chose to cut my hair 5 years ago because I wanted a new look. Something to make me look more edgy and show off my beautiful features, especially my cheekbones, more. I feel like if you can rock a low cut, you can rock anything.

Hair doesn't define beauty, YOU define beauty.

Want more stories like this? Sign up for our newsletter here to receive our latest articles and news straight to your inbox.

Originally published on April 3, 2018

From Classical To Heart: All The Different Styles A Vagina Can Be

When was the last time you held a mirror and took a good look at your pussy? I mean a real hard look at it. What does she look like? Is your vagina normal? Several years ago, I received a DM from a young lady asking me this very question. She wanted to know if her vagina looked “normal.” She went on to explain that her pussy wasn’t as "pretty" as the ones she’d seen in porn and how insecure that made her feel. I can totally relate to her insecurities. I couldn’t begin to tell you how many jokes I’ve heard over the years from men about women and their vaginas. I would be lying if I said I’ve never pondered the same.

Keep reading...Show less
The daily empowerment fix you need.
Make things inbox official.
Tiffany Haddish Turned Down A $10 Million Deal Because It Didn't Align With Her Values

With what seems like a meteoric rise to fame, Tiffany Haddish has had to learn how to operate from a place where her childhood didn’t dictate her spending habits. The L.A. native grew up in the foster care system and was a struggling comedian until she got her big break in Girls Trip. In her interview with Cosmopolitan, Tiffany admitted that her broke days sometimes come back to haunt her and ultimately influence her money decisions.

Keep reading...Show less
5 Benefits Of Matcha That Will Make You Want To Drink It Every Day

For as long as I can remember, I have been a lowkey-highkey caffeine addict. Don't let them fool you, caffeine is most definitely a drug. And while some might argue that it is healthier to consume coffee versus beverages like energy drinks or sodas, there is a thin line between its pros and cons. Starting my day with coffee has become a bit of a ritual as much as it has become a necessity. Without it, the caffeine withdrawal would lead to a splitting headache, a decrease in energy, and that infamous midday slump. It hardly seemed worth it to switch my habit to something healthier. However, after doing some research, I decided to make the switch (at least part-time) to drinking matcha.

Keep reading...Show less
Jurnee Smollett Is Learning To Heal: 'I'm Exactly Where I'm Supposed To Be'

Fans have witnessed Jurnee Smollett’s beautiful growth in television and film. From captivating audiences at just 11 years old in the beloved film Eve’s Bayou to going toe-to-toe with white supremacists and supernatural forces in HBO’s Lovecraft Country, Jurnee has often kept our eyes glued to the screen (big or small.) At 35 years old, the Spiderhead star is at a place where she is focused on healing and being in control of her own destiny.

Keep reading...Show less
These Are The Hair Trends Bringing The Heat This Summer & Beyond

One of my favorite aspects of being a Black woman is the dedication to our ever-changing hair. Forever testing the bounds, we love staying a step ahead while placing no limits on what we can do with a lot of texture and a little imagination. Our hair is a lifestyle and the art of being a Black woman includes our diverse range of looks we can pull off from one week to the next. Whether a sleek pony or beachy body waves, we can literally pull off anything we set our mind to.

Keep reading...Show less
Exclusive Interviews
Latest Posts