Momma’s Baby, Daddy’s Maybe: Why I Prefer To Date Single Dads

Dating

I remember being 22 and pregnant with my first daughter. The bold question from my uncle, "Are you prepared to take care of this child by yourself?" continues to resonate until this very day.


I assumed he was just being yet another pessimistic, overprotective male family member. Yet, I had no clue this thought-provoking question would become my reality.

Society trains us to believe that there is a "right" way to go about having a child.

Get your education, secure a career, get married, and then create a family. While this sounds all well and good, and does increase the opportunity for a stable foundation, what everyone failed to teach us was how to be prepared for the possibility of becoming a single parent. Even in the case of such "proper" prior planning. My uncle was probably the only person I've encountered to keep it real and suggest that the priority be to plan for the worst-case scenario.

As young ambitious partners, we don't always fully think about long-term parenting responsibilities, such as the financial demands of clothing, food, healthcare, child care, etc.

We also don't take into consideration the possibility of becoming the child's primary parent or, in worse circumstances, the only parent.

As mothers, we don't imagine ourselves one day possibly being the head of household who not only has to maintain this child's survival via food in the refrigerator, electricity in the home, and a roof over their head, but in addition, we are primarily responsible for all things relative to this human being and with little or no help from the father.

If I could have done it all over again, I would still have my children, just with someone different, preferably someone who was already a father.

When people are boasting the societal norm to do things the "right way," never do they take into consideration two people who are new to parenting and what type of parent they will turn out to be.

Most women are natural caretakers, thus parenting becomes something we dive into and master on our own or with some guidance from other women in our lives. Fathers on the other hand don't naturally carry the exact same parenting/caretaker trait that women do.

While there are some very hands-on and active fathers, many leave the majority of the parenting to the mothers.

Many of these fathers adapt to the role of the financial caretaker and, to them, that is parenting enough. The fathers described here possibly come from a background of learned behavior in which their father mainly provided financial support, was absent from the home, or the women in their life trained them to believe that the bare minimum is all there is to fatherhood and the rest is the mother's responsibility.

It is then that the child's mother, whether married or not, is left with the bulk of the responsibility.

The mother is the primary contact for school or daycare, the mother is first to leave work when receiving the emergency illness calls. She's responsible for the morning drop off and afternoon pick-up, she's responsible for the doctor's appointments, she's responsible for night and morning routines. She is the point person for almost everything relative to the child's well-being.

Meanwhile, the father is totally disconnected from much of the above and, in some cases, his parents are more connected to these matters than he is himself.

Again, this does not apply to all fathers, but unfortunately in my case and largely in the black community, there is a norm that the majority of parenting is a Mother's job. The proof is also evidenced by the mother's inability to partake in certain lifestyle events without having to secure reliable childcare first. Many fathers are able to come and go as they please without a worry in the world as to who will be responsible for the child they created, as long as the mother is involved and fit as a parent.

I've watched the elders in any given father's life take over his parenting responsibilities, training him to believe his role is separate from that of a mother's, and I've also listened to these women say that certain responsibilities are a "mother's job." Besides bonding with a newborn the first few days and breastfeeding, I do not believe any other part of parenting to solely be a "mother's job." Not only was I raised by a man (my father), I grew up watching the men in my family be very active in their children's lives and met male friends who too carried out just as much responsibility as the mother. Those elders who trained men to believe the majority of parenting is a "mother's job" are just further aiding the issue.

My hope is that society moves away from the idealized way of preparing us for parenthood.

Truth is, it's very unfortunate that no matter how much you prepare for a child or get married and make a plan, you simply cannot predict what type of father a man will be unless he already has a child, and even then, you still can't guarantee the ideal situation.

As a 34-year-old single parent of two, this is why I now prefer to date single fathers. Meeting a single father allows me to learn more about his parenting style and helps avoid getting into another failed attempt at establishing a 50/50 parenting foundation.

Being involved with a single father means I can learn more about his beliefs around the balance of parental responsibility, no matter if we're married or co-parenting.

For ladies that wish to start their family from scratch as two individuals new to parenting, I suggest you take into consideration your partner's upbringing and make sure he wasn't raised to believe that a child is momma's baby and daddy's maybe.

xoNecole is always looking for new voices and empowering stories to add to our platform. If you have an interesting story or personal essay that you'd love to share, we'd love to hear from you. Contact us at submissons@xonecole.com

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